PRIVATE FIRE BRIGADE AT PLOW PLANT

PRIVATE FIRE BRIGADE AT PLOW PLANT

Among the manufacturing houses that have brought the maintenance of private fire brigades up to a standard of perfection is the Parlin & Orendorff Company, whose large agricultural implement factory is at Canton. Ill. Recently a party of city executives and fire fighters from various points in Illinois visited the plant when the fire fighting equipment was fully explained. The plant, at which this well organized fire brigade is established, and which is so well equipped with devices for fighting fire, covers twenty-six acres. The brigade consists of a chief, first assistant chief, second assistant chief, eight division captains and 39 firemen, making a total of fifty men. The equipment for fire protection includes 26 fire hydrants, a 100,000 gallon steel tower, 100 feet high to supply water to the sprinkler system, a 50,000 gallon tower, 75 feet high, as a reserve service for the sprinkler system; 10,000 automatic sprinkler heads throughout the factory, 130,000 feet ot pipe for connecting the sprinkler system with the source of water supply and controlled by 27 dry pipe systems and 9 wet pipe systems. There are 20,000 feet of underground pipe, under the factory, eight hose houses, each supplied with 150 to 300 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose; one hose cart with 1,000 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose, 3,000 feet of hose being used altogether for fire protection; a 3,500,000 gallon reservoir, two underwriters’ fire pumps, with a capacity of 1,000 gallons per minute each. connecting a 3,810,000 gallon supply to the underground piping supplying the hydrants and sprinkler heads; 350 hand chemical extinguishers. A telephone fire alarm connects all departments, there are 25 factory departments, with the Parlin & Orendorff central exchange, the concern’s power plant and the city fire department. The thoroughness with which everything connected with fire fighting at the plant is attended to is shown by a booklet issued by the company and entitled, “Rules and Regulationsof the P. & O. Fire Brigade.” This booklet specifies the duties of the various men in the brigade, instructions to heads of departments and others not in the brigade, the system of fire alarms, sounded by the regular shop whistle, file alarm telephone signals, and instructions for drills. The drill instructions are: “Drills, at which all the officers and members are expected to be present, will be held at the close of working hours, on the first Friday of each month from April until October. From November to March practice will be on the 12th of each month at such hour as may be designated by notice from the Fire Chief. Special drill practice may be called by the sound of the air whistle at irregular intervals whenever the Fire Chief may deem it expedient. Members will always remain in their respective departments on day of practice until the drill whistle signal ts given.” The brigade is composed of: George W. Ford, fire chief; Louis W. Durant, first assistant chief; William H. Middlekauff, second assistant chief; hose division, Frank B. Chapman, captain; Ichabod J. Fuller, Fred. Warren, jas. Hippie; hydrant division. Charles C. Milhonc, captain; B. D. Rrown, Forest E. Boostrcm and Fred F. Trigg: pipe division, Walter C. Sebree, captain; H. I.. Hamilton, Gus Pierson, John R. Davalt, David Buchen, Bert L. Buchen, C. Rumlcr, H. B. Delphy; pump division, T. J. O’Reilly, captain; J. H. Moorehouse, J. P. Sherman: firemen division, Tolar Baer, head fireman; Glenn Parks; ladder division, J. Grafton Moss, captain; William W. Bordner, Percy K. McGinnis. Emil Johnson; chemical division, Alva R. Howland, captain; electrical division, Jesse A. Fisher, captain; Harlan F. Gregg, J. K. Berger; gate keepers, Andrew W. Reeder, Elm St. (Day); Frank Chaddock. Elm St. (Night); Wallace Hammond, Walnut St. (Day); Samuel E. Ellis, Walnut St. (Night); messengers, M. Kinnanon, Albert Spencer, F. Hunnicut; day police, Edward S. Cramlet, William E. Elmore; night police, Charles F. Berkey; janitors, John D. Allaman, (Day); John Izer, (Night); secretary, W. O. McCord. The booklet says: “At the sound of alarms the officers and members of the entire Fire Brigade will proceed to their stations with as little confusion and as much dispatch as possible, and remain there subject to the orders of their captains. The necessity for coolness and promptness cannot be emphasized too strongly, as one clear head can accomplish more work than any number of excited men. As there is always a chance that the fire will be serious and the Fire Brigade prove unsuccessful, the City Fire Department should be called immediately.” Within the limits of the factory gates 1,400 different sizes and styles of plows, harrows, cultivators, planters and other implements are manufactured. The visiting party of city executives and fire fighters consisted of a main delegation numbering 142 and a second party numbering 25, making a total of 167 visitors who were shown through the various departments where all manner ol safety devices are installed and were particularly interested in the perfection of the fire fighting arrangements.

TWENTY-FIVE OF THE 350 THREE-GALLON EXTINGUISHERS IN THE PARLIN & ORENDORFF FACTORY—ONE OF THE CHEMICAL AND HOSE STATIONS AT THE PLANT.GROUND PLAN OF THE PARLIN & ORENDORFF FACTORY, CANTON, ILL.—FIGURES IN CIRCLES INDICATE FIRE BLOCK NUMBERS.THE PARLIN & ORENDORFF COMPANY’S PLANT, CANTON, ILL.FIRE PUMPS IN PARLIN & ORENDORFF PLANT—TO THE LEFT IS THE WATER END OF DEAN FIRE PUMP AND TO THE RIGHT THE CANTON HUGHES FIRE PUMP.

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