Proceedings of the A. W. W. A. Convention

Proceedings of the A. W. W. A. Convention

In this issue is printed the second instalment of excerpts from the official proceedings of the American Water Works Association’s convention held at Montreal on June 21 to 25, 1920. These proceedings will prove especially valuable to those who for any reason were prevented from attending this very successful gathering of the association. The discussions of the various papers are placed in their regular order so as to preserve the sequence of the proceedings, but it is suggested that those of our readers who do not make a practice of keeping a file of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING retain the copies containing these proceedings until the excerpts from the papers discussed are published, as they will be in later issues, so that the discussions may be read again in connection with them. These preceedings will run through subsequent issues of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING until all of the sessions of the convention have been covered.

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Proceedings of the A. W. W. A. Convention

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Proceedings of the A. W. W. A. Convention

Last week FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING presented a running report of the doings at the 40th annual convention of the American Water Works Association. In this issue we print the first instalment of the Proceedings. These will be continued until the entire convention has been covered. The Montreal convention was one of the most successful that the association has ever held, both as regards attendance, enthusiasm and the interest taken by the members in the various meetings. At practically every session, the commodious meeting hall was thronged with members and their guests, papers were listened to with marked attention and wherever discussion of the various subjects was allowed it was both spontaneous and general. To the superintendents who were fortunate enough to attend this convention these sessions with their papers and discussions were particularly instructive, and not one of these men but must have returned to his department with some new ideas gleaned from these proceedings. In this connection lay the only fault of the convention, as through the length of some of the papers much of the discussion had to be omitted for lack of time. This was rather unfortunate as, no doubt, many other instructive short addresses from superintendents and others were thus lost by those present.

This convention again emphasizes the necessity that confronts the association of bringing into its ranks all of the superintendents of water departments and water companies in this broad land. There is no doubt that the future strength and influence of the American Water Works Association will depend upon this. It must include in its roster the names of every water works man, and the result of this will be inevitable, as suggested by President Davis in his address—the absorption of the smaller sectional water works associations into one large body and the formation of a strong society that can speak with authority for the water works of the country. The fruition of this plan will hang very largely upon the universal membership of the water works men of the country in the ranks of such an association.