Procrastination in Improvements

Procrastination in Improvements

In the past four years, as is only too well known by water works men, the price of materials, supplies and labor have increased from 100 to 200 per cent, owing to the war and the unsettled condition of the labor market. At the close of the war, and with the prospect of the consummation of a permanent and lasting peace, activities in the matter of improvements and additions to water works, sewer departments and sewage disposal plants were resumed, and many cities took advantage of this to put under way plans that had been held in abeyance for patriotic reasons or from lack of material and workmen. These forehanded departments have reaped the benefits of their wisdom, and, in many instances, are either now enjoying the fruits of added efficiency which the improvements and additions to their plants have brought or will very shortly be doing so. There are others, however, who, from various reasons—the hope of obtaining lower or more advantageous terms, a reluctance to spend money, or other causes—have procrastinated in pushing to completion the needed improvements. In most cases these people have had a rude awakening, and the only result of their hesitation has been public criticism and dissatisfaction and the loss of the advantages which the improvements, if pushed to completion at the proper time, would have given them. Now the work has to be done anyway, and nothing has been saved by their procrastination.

No posts to display