PROMINENT WATER WORKS MEN.

PROMINENT WATER WORKS MEN.

TIMMOTHY WOODRUFF, BRIDGETON, N. J., Superintendent of the city water works, was born in Bridgeton in 1841. He learned machinist’s trade in Philadelphia. He entered the United States Navy as engineer during the war, serving four years, and receiving an honorable discharge, after which he was eight years with the old Camden and Amboy and Pennsylvania Railroad company, and has been in his present position eighteen years, doing efficient work.

A. A. TUCKER, MEMPHIS, TENN.,

Superintendent, of mains, was born in Hardin county. Tennessee, in 1853, and began in the water business in 1882 with the Memphis Water company. He remained with that company, serving in different capacities until its consolidation witli the Artesian Water company, when he was chosen to his present position and has held it continuously since. He lms been a member of the American Water W orks association since the twelfth convention in New York.

JOHN A. MOODY, CHICAGO, ILL.,

Was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1844 and graduated from Amherst college in 1866. He went immediately to Chicago and entered the service of the city where lie has been ever since. For many years he was superintendent of water extension and is now serving his second term asdep uty commissioner public works.

M. F. WRIGHT, MERRILL, WIS.,

Superintendent of the water system, is a New Kn: land man and for forty years lived in Lowell, Mass., sei zing as superintendent of the water system from 1881 to .• 88. Preferring work with a private company to a mun ‘pa position, he associated himself with the American Water Works and Guarantee company of Pittsburg, which controls thirty systems in thirteen States, and was assigned to service at Merrill, Wis. When he took charge of the system it had nine miles of pipe; now it has fifteen. The system is direct pumping, with two 1,500,000 gallon each Deane pumps. The domestic pressure is forty pounds and fire pressure 110. There are three sources of supply—a sand filter along the bank of the river, a system of twenty Cook strainer wells about twenty three feet deep, backed by Prairie river (one of the finest streams of water in the Northwest), composed of almost pure spring water, with not a settlement above Merrill for thirty miles. Mr. Wright’s part in the development of the present excellent system bias been important. He is a member of the American Water Works Association, and has attended all conventions since, and including the one held in Chicago. He is an example of an aggressive, progressive water works man.

L M. CASK, DETROIT, Mil’ll.

General superintendent and secretary of the water works was born in Painesville, O., in 1842, His parents moved to Michigan in 1845, so Mr. Case is almost a Michigan man after all. In 1861 he enlisted and served continuously with the exception of ten months until the war closed, and was mustered out with his regiment. Enlisting as a private he rose to the rank of captain, though but twenty-two years of age at the close of the •war, ami was brevetted major for special gallantry in his last battle. In 1866 he entered the service of the Detroit water board in a subordinate capacity anil in 1889 was appointed to his present position. What his work has been the general excellence of the water works shows.

C. 8. BROWN, TOLEDO,O.,

Has been connected with water works affairs for sixteen years and for five years was secretary of the Toledo water works. For several years he represented the National Meter company in the West and made an enviable record. For the past six years he has been general western agent of the Hersey Manufacturing company. He joined the. American Water Works association at its Columbus. O., meeting thirteen years ago and has missed only one meeting since.

Toledo wanted a good man for water works trustee at the hist election. Accordingly Mr. Brown was put on the ticket and received a larger number of votes than any other candidate, leading the head of the ticket by 3,600 votes. This action of Toledo is conclusive evidence of the esteem in which he is held by his fellow citizens.

F. C. BARNUM, NAUGNTUCK, CONN.,

Secretary, treasurer, and general manager of the water company, was born in Kent, Ct., in 1844. In 1861 he began in the mercantile business as clerk, and eight years later began business for himself in a general store, which he continued until 1892. In June, 1892, he was elected to his present position, and has served continuously since. The system has two reservoirs holding 7,000,000 gallons, and the storage reservoir above holding 50,000,000. Some improvements are contemplated this year, including the raising of the storage reservoir dam eight feet, thereby increasing the capacity fifty million gallons.

H. H. HARRISON,

Was born in Wheeling, W. Ya., in 1849. He is prominently identified with the St. Paul Civil Engineering Club. He was made manager of the Stillwater, Minn., water works in 1880 and has been manager of the Garland Trust company of Arkansas since 1893.

H. H. HARRISON, C. E.

ROBERT J. THOMAS, LOWELL. MASS.,

Superintendent of the water works department, was born in Lowell, thirty-eight years ago. He served in the common council in 1881-82, in the aldermen the next two years. He was elected superintendent of the water works in 1888 and served two years. A successor was elected in 1889, but in 1893 he was chosen again, and has served continuously since, being reelected for his sixth term last March. He was with the National Meter company two years and with the Hegeman & Oliphant Filter company one year. The present efficiency of the Lowell department is largely due to Mr. Thomas untiring efforts for improve ment.

FRED CROSBY, MONTGOMERY, ALA.,

General manager and secretary of the Capital City Water company, was born in 1861, received a common school education and graduated at the English high school in 1878. ‘After leaving school he entered the employ of Rice & Hutchins, large manufacturers of boots and shoes. After working two years in their office as boy and assistant bookkeeper, he was given charge of the shipping department and in two year’s time became salesman, occupying that position until 1885 when, owing to lung trouble, he was obliged to leave Boston for a warmer climate. In January, 1886, he went to Montgomery with A. H. Howland, who was then building a system of water works for the Capital City Water company, taking charge of the receiving and distribution of all the material used in construction. In May, 1886, he went to Racine, Wis., upon similar work for the same contractor, and in the fall of that year was in Mr. Howland’s Boston office. In January, 1867, he went to Durham, N. C., where a system of water works was being constructed, remaining there until April 1, 1887, when he returned to Montgomery to accept the position of secretary and cashier of the Capital city Water company, W. F. Ellis, Jr., of Boston, becoming superintendent at the same time. Upon Mr. Mr. Ellis’ resignation in the fall of 1888, Mr. Crosby was made superintendent, and in 1893 was elected its general manager.

The property of the Capital City Water company, which is a solvent corporation, was put into the hands of the Fed eral court last December to check parties having no interest whatsoever in the property, but who were attempting to obtain possession of it as receivers through the state courts.

Mr. Crosby was appointed receiver of the property and is now profitably operating the plant under the direction of the federal court.

PROMINENT WATER-WORKS MEN.

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PROMINENT WATER-WORKS MEN.

B. M. ESPY.CLEMENS HERSCHEL.F. A. W. DAVIS.W. P. THARP.R. M. CLAYTON.A. A. TUCKER.J. N. TUBBS.W. H. WATTS.L. H. GARDNER.