PROMOTIONAL STUDY COURSE

PROMOTIONAL STUDY COURSE

Herein is presented a series of definitions, questions and answers designed to aid fire department officers in preparing themselves for promotional examinations. In this department, which appears monthly, will be included questions typical of examinations held throughout the country.

The answers below are to questions appearing in the October issue:

  1. Vertical ducts.
  2. They carry fire over entire building, sometimes permitting it to drop down between studdings.
  3. Yes.
  4. On ground floor to cover basement stair entrance.
  5. To rear outside basement stairs.
  6. Make survey of entire building to make sure that no concealed fire remains.
  7. Between floor beams or in attic.
  8. No, it is better to throw them to the street, where fire may be extinguished without water damage.
  9. No, for this makes unnecessary water damage. Dip ends of burning rags, etc., in utensil containing water.
  10. They should be opened up and inspected for concealed fire.
  11. Because the fire rises and because doors leading to stair hall are usually left open.
  12. Where conditions permit, ladders are usually placed at the leeward side.
  13. Take nobody’s word, but make sure of it yourself.
  14. Exposure hazard to buildings in neighborhood from flying embers.
  15. Extinguishing large quantities of burning film.
  16. Low buildings.
  17. Poisonous gases and gas explosions.
  18. Yes.
  19. Water.
  20. Lumber, upholstery materials, and flammable volatiles, used in painting operations.
  21. Solution: First average, and then combine the two parallel 2 1/2-inch lines. 600 + 400 = 1000 / 2 = 500 ft. aver. length. Factor for combining two parallel lines is 3.6 500 / 3.6 = 139 ft. Add 100 ft. line: 139 + 100 = 239 feet, length of combined line E.P. (Hyd. P)= N.P. x (1.1 + KL) K = .248 L = 239 / 50 = 4.78 E.P. (Hyd. P) 40 x (1.1 + .248 x 4.78) = 40 x (1.1 + 1.185) — 40 x 2.285 = 91.4 pounds. This hydrant pressure is sufficient to overcome friction loss and give nozzle pressure, but it does not take into account the back pressure due to the elevation of the nozzle. Nozzle is 3 stories above hydrant outlet, or 3×12 = 36 feet. Back pressure = 36 x .434 = 15.6 pounds. Corrected hydrant pressure is then 91.4+ 15.6= 107.0 pounds.
  22. Move patient to point of safety and summon physician, or department surgeon.
  23. Flow from artery is bright red, and spurting; flow from vein is dark red or purplish and flows with a smooth stream.
  24. By applying pressure at the point of bleeding.
  25. Apply cold cloths or cracked ice over nose and at the back of the neck.
  26. To prevent infection.
  27. Cover the hands with several folds of surgical gauze.
  28. With a piece of surgical gauze moistened with turpentine or benzine.
  29. Only for very small wounds or in special cases where its use seems imperative.
  30. Wound should not be bandaged too tightly unless necessary to stop bleeding.
  31. First boil the penknife blade in water for ten minutes, or pass it once or twice through the flame of a lamp.
  32. Slowly; so that the hosemen may have chance to brace themselves against rising nozzle pressure.
  33. Slowly; to prevent water hammer in mains.
  34. It heats the water to excessive temperature.
  35. It will cause engine to lose its priming.
  36. No. At least 3 to 5 pounds pressure should be maintained on the intake side.
  37. Yes; to permit immediate access to parts for making quick adjustments.
  38. In cold weather.
  39. The piston pump.
  40. Sulphur.
  41. Wood pump manufacture, rubber compounding, and production of sulphuric acid.
Fire Apparatus of Palm Springs. Cal. The truck at the right is the one exhibited at the I. A. F. C. convention at Spokane. Wash., by the Mack International Motor Truck Corporation. Included in the picture from left to right are: Dick Cornell. Fire Engine Division, Mack Company. Los Angeles; William Leonesio, Chief, Palm Springs Fire Department, Palm Springs: Ray Sorum. Fire Commissioner. Palm Springs, and John Kline, Ex-Commissioner, Palm Springs Fire District.
  1. In carboys, iron drums, glass bottles and metal tank cars. Yes.
  2. Because of its explosibility.
  3. Vegetable, animal and mineral oils.
  4. No.
  5. No.
  6. Yes. Both induce spontaneous ignition.
  7. Benzine, fuel oil, gasoline and kerosene.

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