PROTECTION ON GOVERNOR’S ISLAND.

PROTECTION ON GOVERNOR’S ISLAND.

Governor’s Island in New York Harbor is materially cut off from the city’s fire department, except that of the fireboats. It has, therefore, a fire brigade of its own under Capt. Walker of the 8th Infantry, so as to guard against the risks of arty fire that might attack the buildings, and especially the magazines. A fire alarm at night is given by the firing of two shots at thirty seconds’ interval from a sentry’s rifle, from a cannon in the day time. A bugler at once sounds a special fire call, and as all these signals are well known to the men, they turn out on the moment. To each company a special part is assigned, and the men know where to run to. The call is two sudden blasts of the bugle, followed by slow ones—the latter showing the location of the fire. The apparatus is kept in the north portion of the barracks, and consists of two hose carts, a hook and ladder truck, with extension ladders, which overtop any building on the island, and a bucket and salvage brigade. No fire engine is used, the required pressure being obtained from the pumps of the ferryboat General Hancock, which must at once turn for the spot, wherever she is or on whatever duty she is emptoved The quick work of the bucket brigade has put out many small fires There is fire drill every Saturday afterm on at 12:30 provided the weather is clear. Two lines of hose are used: the water is turned in front the fireplugs without delay; the ladders are raised to the roofs; and the bucket and salvage brigades are sent up with buckets of water, just as if there were a real fire.

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