Providing for Small Town Improvements

Providing for Small Town Improvements

While the water works superintendents of larger cities and those of the smaller municipalities have, of course, many problems in common, yet there are other such questions which arise that are peculiar to each. Of the two, perhaps, the small town or city man has the most knotty questions to solve when it comes to the matter of providing “the wherewithal” for water works improvements. The principal reason for this is, naturally, the fact that the resources of the small place are less and, therefore, the expenditure of what to the large city would lie a comparatively little amount, may prove a heavy burden to the smaller municipality.

It requires a certain amount of bravery and no end of foresight to successfully go before the average city council of a small municipality and attempt to demonstrate the necessity for the expenditure of a large sum of money in the improvement of the water supply system. Bravery, because it is quite possible that the superintendent may be subjected to a severe grilling by some representative of the people who will object to the expenditure and try to show that some ulterior motive is behind it. This type of “city father” is only too frequently met with.

The superintendent will also need foresight, in that he must he prepared to show the powers-that-be conclusively that the suggested expenditures for improvements are necessary not only to the present welfare of the city or town, but also to its future growth and prosperity. In order to do this he must not only know his system thoroughly, but must also be able to visualize the city of the future, its probable extent and the needs of the water works to properly keep pace with this growth. If he can bring his council, or whatever governing body the town has, to follow him in his prediction and back up any improvements that he will suggest looking to future development, he will become the greatest public benefactor his municipality could have. For on the ample facilities of the water supply system of a town that is extending—and this applies to all which are not retrograding—depends more than on almost any other thing the continuation of this growth and prosperity.

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