PRPARING FOR FILTRATION.

PRPARING FOR FILTRATION.

PHILADELPHIA will require 459 acres of land for the conetruction of filtration plants under the plans recommended by the commission of experts and adopted by the municipal administration. Under the law three months’ notice must be given to the owners of the land, who, however, may be offered a fair sum for immediate possession. By far the largest tract of land to be taken is the farm belonging to the estate of Joseph Harrison, jr., at Torresdale, where it is expected that all the future extensions of the filtration system will be made. The ground is in two tracts—the larger lying between State road and the Delaware river, and the smaller, between State load and the New York division of the Pennsylvania railroad, bounded on the north by Eleven Mile lane, or Linden avenue, and on the south by Pennypack creek,containing in all 327.2 acres. The next largest lot of ground is that selected for the site of the beds to filter the water pumped from Belmont station for the use of West Philadelphia. Speaking generally, it embraces all the land in the triangle bounded on the west by Belmont road, on the east by Monument avenue, and on the north by City avenue and Overbrook avenue. The lower end of the triangle is occupied by the Home for Deaf Children, which will not be disturbed. The ground to be taken aggregates 60.6 acres For the filter beds at Roxborough there will be taken 34.7 acres of ground lying immediately north of the big reservoir, bounded on the south by Port Royal avenue, on the north by Hampton street, on the east by Horner street, and on the west by Hagy street. The Queen Lane filterbeds will be constructed on lands lying north of the reservoir, between McMiehael, or Thirty-second street, and the Pennsylvania railroad, inteisected by Midvale avenue and Queen street, containing30.9 acres. For the pumping station, to be used in lifting the “raw” water from the present reservoir to the filter beds, which will be at a somewhat greater elevation than tbe big basin, there is to be taken a piece of ground containing nearly three acres, on the line of the railroad at Bowman street—this piece being selected because of the ease of getting coal into the boilerhouse. At Shawmont it is intended to take the strip of land containing an old icehouse, belonging to the Knickerbocker company, lyingimmediately below the present pumping station, in order to lay sidings and erect modern coal-handling apparatus for the station, which is beingconsiderable enlarged. No estimate is given of the cost of the real estate to be condemned, and which is all assessed at rural rates. The sites are those favored by the experts. No mention is made of the East Park reservoir system. This is one of the problems that the department and its engineers have not yet solved. It is claimed that the Spring Garden pumping station must eventually be abandoned, and the time must come when the Queen Lane district supply must be supplemented, because the area for slow filters at Queen Lane is so limited that provision cannot be made for filtering more than 58,000,000 gallons a day, although the quantity of water to be used in that district must be hereafter considerably greater To supply this deficiency it was proposed to install high-service pumps at the East Park filter plant, to pump from this reservoir to the Queen Lane basin. For East Park was proposed a mechanical filtering plant, to be erected on Park laud, south of the reservoir, near Thirty-third street, owing to the greater filtering capacity that can be had on a limited space, and the smaller loss that would ensue from its removal, provided it was not worn out before the time came to abandon Spring Garden pumping station. Separate slow sandfiltering beds may be built to supply the East Park basin, or East Park may be connected with the big filterbeds at Torresdale, which can be expanded to a capacity of 300,000,000 gallons a day, though the present plan contemplates supplying only 50,000,000 gallons daily

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