Pumps Suitable for India

Pumps Suitable for India

Alfred Chatterton, director of commerce and industries for the Mysore government, who is considered the best authority in India on the subject of pumps and motive power, states that during the last four or five years a number of direct-coupled petrol or gasoline engines and centrifugal pumps have been used under his direction and found extremely useful within a very limited range of service. He thinks, however, that they would not be practicable machines to place in the hands of native agriculturists for irrigation works, as in the first place the bill for repairs would be much too high and gasoline too costly, and finally he doubts very much if the Indian farmers could keep such machines in order. He mentioned that for irrigation work in India they would have to run practically 10 to 12 hours a day and for 200 to 250 days in the year. He says that in southern India these machines have already been used for testing purposes, and the compactness and lightness of the sets render them easy to transport. For such work 4-inch pumps are used, delivery about 20,000 gallons of water per hour, and driven with two-cylinder 12-horsepower motors. For garden purposes the small pump that might be exported from the United States for about $100 might find a market in India. He is inclined to think, however, that while such types of American centrifugal pumps as have been called to his attention are very cheap, they possess too low efficiency for general irrigation purposes, and the delivery of water is insufficient except for small gardens. He thinks American manufacturers might better turn their attention to the construction of pumps of reciprocating types, which in his opinion would give better results.—Consul Henry D. Baker, on Special Commercial Service.

The differences between the borough of Island Heights, N. J., and the Water Company has resulted in the three arbitrators setting a price of $28,000 on the company’s plant. This is considered too low by the company, and it may appeal to the courts. The borough officials say they have an estimate from a reliable contractor, who offers to duplicate the plant and give bonds to complete it for the sum of $22,000.

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