Raiding the Forests.

Raiding the Forests.

Gifford Pinchot, chief of the United States Forest Service, in a recently published letter spoke of the disappearance of the forests in New England, where the farmers, “without meaning it and without doing anything wrong,” caused the danger-point in forest use to be reached. He added that “there are few parts of the country which more greatly need to take a new point of view in handling the forests—the point of view of conservation.” He went on to point out that the New England forests should he conserved, not only in a proper way for lumbering purposes, but, also, “to maintain the waterpowers of the streams and the channels of the navigable rivers. The principal wealth of New England is her manufactures, and her centres of manufacture are on the rivers which rise in the mountain forests. These mountain forests, which are natural reservoirs, are more valuable for the protection they give to the streams than for anything else. To lumber them in the usual way, which leaves no hope of future forest growth, is not only to exhaust the wood: it is to make the water in the streams and rivers irregular in flow and unreliable for use, and, for part of the year, either entirely useless or exceedingly destructive. In a hilly country without forests you have first too much water, then too little. There is no reason why the forests of the White Mountains and of the Green Mountains should not he made to yield up their lumber in the proper way.” The raids made by lumbermen and others who laid waste the forests in the manner which is so commonly followed, he utterly condemned.

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