RANDOM SPARKS

RANDOM SPARKS

  • Letchworth Hose Company No. 5 of Auburn, is to have a new house.
  • The Binghamton N. Y. Fire Department is in favor of shut-off nozzles and will introduce them.
  • On the 26th ultimo Lewis Crabtree was appointed Chief Engineer of the Waukegan, Ill., Fire Department.
  • Fire Chief C. W. Eaton, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was the guest of his friend, Supt. Bullwinklc, of Chicago, last week.
  • Lodi, Wisconsin, twenty miles north of Madison, suffered from a severe fire recently. The town is without fire protection. Manufacturers take notice.
  • A contract has been closed with the authorities of Nashville, Tenn., for water-works, with a capacity which is to be 10,000,000 gallons per day, for $90,000.
  • Hoc. Alex. Divcn, the energetic Superintendent of the LaFrance Fire Engine Company, and ex-Mayor of Elmira, N. Y., paid Chicago and St. Louis a hurried visit last week.
  • An exchange says: The first person who sounds an alarm of fire at Batavia, N. Y., by ringing the fire bell receives a dollar, but he earns the money, as he has to keep on ringing it foi an hour.
  • A social dance was given by Vigilant Hook and Ladder Company, of Walla Walla, Washington Territory, in celebration of their Fourth Anniversary, at Stahl s Opera House, on the night of May 3.
  • At Fort Worth, Texas, April 25, delegations of Firemen, city officials, and citizens from Dallas, Terrell, Gainesville, Corsicana, Denton, Cleburne,
  • Weathersford, Sherman and Dennison witnessed the testing of the new waterworks. The test was a success.
  • The Telegraph and Telephone Companies have filed a bill in court praying for an order restraining the City of Chicago from cutting the companies wires in the attempt to enforce the city ordinance, requiring that all telegraph and telephone wires be laid under ground by May 1. The city has agreed to refrain from cutting wires until decisions can be rendered upon these bills.
  • The Committee of Arrangements for the coming Iowa Firemens’ Tournament, to be held in Waterloo in June, have received assurances from the Illinois Central, Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Northern, and the Chicago and Northwestern railroads, that they will carry Firemen in uniform for one per cent per mile, each way, and other visitors at one fare for the round trip. Board during the tournament can be obtained at $2 per day. A good time is promised, and the prospects arc, there will be a large attendance.
  • At Wapakoncta, O., April 25, the Annual Convention of the Northwestern Ohio Volunteer Firemens’ Association, in session, elected the following officers for the ensuing year: President, William H. Kessinger, of Findlay; VicePresident, J. C. Howe, of Kenton ; Secretary, H. H. Shriner, of Shelby; Treasurer, J. H. Vonstein, of Upper Sandusky. St. Marys.was selected as the place for the annual Tournament, and Findlay for the next Convention.
  • Matt Benner, of Chicago, ex-Fire Marshal and patentee of a firpescape, stand-pipe and ladder, has purchased a lot 155×150 feet on Jefferson street, north of Harrison street, for $10,750. The lot has the advantage of alleys on three sides, and is especially suited for manufacturing purposes. Mr. Benner will immediately improve it with a five-story building, designed for the manufacture of his fire-escapes. The cost will probably be from $40,000 to .$50,000.
  • Buffalo, N. Y., has a new fire boat, on which is placed a powerful force pump, requiring six men to work it. It is covered with a box or hood, and can be brought into use at a moment’s notice. It throws a stream an inch and a half in diameter. The boat is propelled by oars, and is to be used as a ferry boat when not called upon to put out fires. It is noteworthy, however, that the affair belongs to the general government, and is in the hands of the life-saving service.
  • The friends of Charles W. Fisher, Chief Engineer of the Fire Department of Vicksburg, Miss., on the evening of April 22, presented him with a Chief Engineer’s fire trumpet, which had been specially made to order for that purpose at Tipton, Mass. It is of twenty-four inch solid silver, engraved and set with gold trimmings, all of which is hand work. The engraving on one side is “Charles W Fisher, Chief Engineer of Vicksburg Fire Department,” and on the reverse side, “ Presented by his friends, Vicksburg, Miss., April, 1883.” The trumpet is appended to a nine inch cord and tassel, costing $12.
  • Chief GeorgeWillis of the Pittsfield, Mass. Fire Department, has been voted a salary by the town fathers of $700 per annum. This is the first salary ever paid the Chief of Department since the organization of the Department in 1841. In the past year Chief Willis has put in the Gamewell Fire Alarm at an expense of $5000 and furnished his Department with three thousand feet of Paragon hose. This year he contemplates introducing the Haley nozzle, and the establishing of a Salvage Corps and other additions. Chief Willis is a live man and takes the most advanced position for the prevention of fires, and is very popular in Western Massachusetts as a citizen and Fireman, he being Vice-President of the State Firemens’ Association.
  • The City of Joliet, Illinois, takes great pride in its perfectly equipped and well-regulated Fire Department, which has sprung from an unskilful Volunteer Department in a comparatively few years to its present complete state, and is now one of the most efficient in the West. Every means of facilitating rapidity ot work has been introduced, and great care has been taken in the selection of the horses. The present Chief of the Department, John Ryan, is an untiring and indefatigable worker, and takes pride in keeping everything pertaining to his duties in first-class shape. John D. Paige, who was the former Chief and the organizer of the Depaitinent, taking it in his uniformed State, has, by his untiring industry and skilful manipulations, laid the foundation, and brought the Department up to • its present high standard.
  • The annual report of Chief G. C. Hale, of the Kansas City Fiie Department shows that the total expenses of the fiscal year were $38,406. The following were the expenditures for improvements during the year: Two new hose carriages, $1400; five horses, $850; 2900 feet of test hose. $2900; repairs on truck, $108.50 ; repairs to No. 1 Engine-house, $99.35 ; purchase of lot at Fifth and Bluff streets, $2850; building Engine-house No. 5. $1631.67; building Engine-house No. 6, $2567.80; total, $12,407.32. In closing his report, Chief Hale said: “ I desire to say a few words in regards to the water-works. Since the last report the water-, works company have laid about six and a quarter miles of pipe in this city, and in Kansas City, Kan., about one mile. They have set in this city fifty-six fire hydrants, and in Kansas City. Kan., seven, making a total of 398 hydrants, as follows: On first eighteen miles of main pipe, 244 ; on other mains, 142 ; on mains ip Kansas City, Kan., 12. The main pipes laid in this city are of the following diameters: Four inches, 9728 feet; six inches, 12,122 feet; eight inches, 4197 feet; ten inches, 3258 feet; twelve inches, 3024 feet; fifteen inches, 582 feet; total, 32,911 feet. In addition to this, the company have re-laid on Twentieth street, Mercer
  • place, Eighteenth and Holly streets, south of Seventeenth, 2333 feet of 20-inch pipe (nearly a half mile) thus relieving the apprehension hitherto felt concerning the danger to which, in its former location, the pipe was liable to slide and then cut off the upper town water supply. There are no hydrants on this long line of pipe. Anticipating the future wants of Whipple’s addition, the water company piovided specials for hydrants at certain intervals which are as much as needed now. I recommend the hydrants be placed connecting with the before mentioned specials at Eighteenth and Hollv and Nineteenth and Mercer place.half way betweenEighteenth and Twentieth, at Twentieth and Mercer place, and also at the following places: At Fifteenth and Genesee, Seventeenth and Genesee, on Genesee between Fourteenth and Fifteenth, Fifteenth and Cherry, Eighteenth and Holmes, Twelfth and Holmes, Twelfth and Charlotte, Twelfth and Troost, Eleventh and Baltimore avenues, two hydrants on Woodland avenue between Independence and Eighth streets. With these hydrants in position the city, so far as the pipe system extends will have all necessary fire protection.
  • Hamilton S. White, a wealthy young man in Syracuse, N. Y., who has always taken a great interest in the Fire Department, and is Assistant Engineer, distinguished himself April 25, at a fire in a house occupied by Mr. Appleton. Three of the Appleton children had been rescued and it was supposed that no one else was in the house. This turned out to be a mistake. ” Upon Mrs. Appleton’s return, says the Syracuse Courier, describing the deed of heroism, “she notified Assistant Engineer Hamilton S. White that two more children were yet in the building. The house was full of smoke, and any attempt to enter was shrouded with danger. Engineer White bravely entered the burning edifice, followed by Fireman Mulherin of the Chemical. In an instant they had gained access to a small bedroom where Hattie, aged five years, and Clara, aged two and a half years. Hattie was borne from the house by Mr. White, and Clara was rescued by Mr. Mulherin. As the brave Firemen almost suffocated by the smoke, appeared at the upper window, with the precious burdens in their arms, they were greeted by the enthusiastic cheers of a multitude of persons below. They reached the ground by means of ladders, where it was found that the children were unconscious. Drs. Stevens and Mumford were summoned, and succeeded in resuscitating them.”
  • Speaking of hotel fires, Inspector William McDavitt of the Insurance Patrol of Philadelphia, recently said to a representative of the Philadelphia Times-. “ The usual report of hotel fires is, The fire started in the basement, near the elevator,’ which is the conclusion arrived at because of the smoke and fire being drawn to and appearing first at that point; then we have the same results to follow and the same scenes to repeat themselves in almost every instance—a blinding and suffocating smoke to fill the upper floors. I have years ago suggested to some of our hotel managers the converting of the elevator into a ventilator or smoke flue by running them out through the roof, with openings into them at the ceiling on every floor, but it is hard to impress or convince them of the value of this, although evidence of its necessity attends every hotel disaster. One objection, they make to this is that it will give the fire draught. Well, let it do so. Attract the fire to one point, get rid of the smoke, and the Firemen will master it. The stairways will then be available. Instances occur where fires ascend and are confined to boxed stairways, inclosed elevators, chutes, and the like, extending all the way up through a building, passing bv all the floors to the top, where, having no outlet, the fire spreads. But there is another want, and that is some system of general alarm to the guests, and l know of only one of our hotels where this feature exists, in the shape of a large fire-bell, which although silent, is one of the ‘ comforts ’ to be had at this house.”

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