RANDOM SPARKS

RANDOM SPARKS

  • Chippewa Falls, Wis., is to have a paid Fire Department.
  • Philadelphia has purchased fifteen horses, at a cost of $2400, for the use of the Fire Department.
  • Peoria, Ill., had 18 fires during the month of February. The aggregate loss by these was $2937.
  • Columbus, Wis., has been unable to find a man willing to become Chief of its Fire Department.
  • San Francisco had eighteen fires during the month of February. The loss involved was $12,919.
  • Mayor Howell, of Brooklyn, has vetoed the bill by which it is proposed to light the streets by naphtha.
  • The proposition to reduce the pay of the Firemen has been defeated by the Pittsburgh Common Council.
  • The citizens of Rome, N. Y., have dismissed the Fire Alarm question, and it will probably be some time before the subject is again agitated.
  • At the last annual eketion in the Watertown, N. Y., Fire Department, William Schults was elected Chief, and W. C. Stone, Assistant Chief.
  • None of the members who were subscribers of Tine JOURNAL were injured at Madison, Wis., in the explosion March 29‘h. Boys, subscribe and be protected.
  • The people of Hamilton, Ont., are much dissatisfied with the present Fire Brigade of that place. Many regard the Chief as inefficient, and call for his dismissal.
  • A number of San Franciscans, dealers in lumber, hay and grain, have petitioned the Supervisors to contract the fire limits of the city so that wooden sheds for storage purposes can be erected.
  • E. M. Morris has brought suit against the water-works company of Clinton, Iowa, for $10,000 damages, upon the ground that it should have prevented his property from being destroyed by fire.
  • Gift Fire Engine Company No. 3, of the Nashville, Tenn., Fire Department, returns its heartfelt thanks to Dr. E. T. Noel for the fifty dollar donation recently received through Chief Stockwell.
  • Chief McFadden, of Memphis, when injured at a fire some weeks ago was the holder of an accident policy, which secured him $15 per week for all the time he was confined to his room and under the care of a physician.
  • Some little time ago the Baltimore Fire Commissioners adopted the plan of suddenly dropping in at night on the Firemen, to see if all was in proper order. They found three absentees, one of whom, upon investigation, was dismissed.
  • At the last meeting of the Marshalltown, Iowa, City Council, Oscar Allen was elected Chief of the Fire Department, Joseph Johnson, First Assistant, and C. C. Shaw, Second Assistant. The former Chief, C W. Woodworth, declined a reelection.
  • New Haven, Conn., has a pyromantic in the person of a young man named John Hogan. He has fired a number of buildings, and is insane upon the subject of fires. The walls of his bedroom are covered with pictures of fires and Firemen. He has been a’rested ard placed under $1000 bonds.
  • James H. White, the Chief of the Peoria, 111., Fire Department, is doing all in his power to make the coming annual Tournament, to be held in that city next September, a grand success. He desires all manufacturing companies who intend offering prizes to send in their names as soon as possible.
  • Charles Stanley, of Danvers, Mass., attempted to set fire to bis store recently
  • by means of barrels filled with hay and shavings, saturated with kerosene. Stanley’s stock was valued at $300, and was insured for $1000. He confessed the deed. It is believed he was crazed by misfortune and did not know what he was doing.
  • The Governor of New Jersey has signed the bill which provides that the insurance companies shall hereafter pay the tax for the benefit of the Firemen directly to the Treasurers of the various Fire Departments, instead of to the Secretary of State, as heretofore. The bill fixes the tax at two per cent upon all premium receipts.
  • At a late fire in Madison, Wis., a number of Firemen were seriously injured by explosions. It is supposed that some incendiary, to better insure the destruction of the building, had placed some explosive materials between the ceiling and the third floor. Three of the Firemen—Choening, Spaulding and Henricks—were so severely burned that they will probably die.
  • Wilber F. Sweet, of Deluge Hose Company No. 2, of the Omaha Fire Department, died at his residence in that city on March 19. In commemoration of his death a meeting of his Company was held, at which resolutions were passed, expressing the warmest admiration for his qualities as a man and a Fireman, and the sincerest regrets for his early death.
  • Two Firemen extinguished a fire in the basement of the Episcopal Church at Ithaca, last Sunday, before the congregation were aware of the cause of a smoky atmosphere. The services were not interrupted. The cool Firemen had brought a Babcock Extinguisher a distance of several blocks and were just in time to prevent a conflagration. Ithaca has some of the best Firemen in the State.
  • At the last election in the Fellowship Hose Company, of the Des Moines, Iowa, Fire Department, there were seventy-six ballots before an election was effected. At last the following officers were chosen: Assistant Chief, Frank Harris; President, R. C. Johnson; Vice-President, J. Parks; Treasurer, J. F. Faulk; Secretary, E. Maxwell; Foreman, J. W. Faulk; Assistant Foreman, J. Parks.
  • Glens Falls, N. Y., had nine alarms and six fires during the past year. The aggregate loss incurred was $2,564. Meredith B. Little, the Chief, reports the expenditures on the Fire Department for the same time to have been $231. The properly of the Department is valued at $8790. The membership numbers 193. The Chief recommends the erection of hose towers in the rear of each Enginehouse, and the purchase of a Bangor Extension Ladder.
  • At the last annual election of the West Side Fire Department of Des Moines, Iowa, the following officers were elected: Hawkcye Hose—Chief, J. McGuire; Assistant Chief, T. Kemp; Foreman, F. Voodry ; Assistant Foreman, J. Sample. Relief Hook and Ladder—Foreman, II. Guttshall; Assistant Foreman, J. Rodenbaugh ; President, D. Uttcrson; Vice-President, J. Rodenbaugh; Secretary, W. S. Mosier; Treasurer, J. Sample.
  • The Common Council of Hudson, N. Y., at a recent session decided to form a Protective Company of (he exempt members of Hose Company No. 1, and to donate for their use Edmonds’ Hand Engine, heretofore held in reserve by No. I. Whether the Hand Engine is to be remodeled for a Protective Wagon or not the City Fathers fail to say. If such is the case the new Company will form a good opposition to the Waggsville Proteciives. The Company is to have no vote for Chief, and to receive no pecuniary aid from the city.
  • As an agent for rapidly extinguishing fires in chimneys, a French chemist recommends the burning of a few pounds of ” carbon-dc-sulphide ” on the hearth. The combustion of this substance produces large volumes of carbonic and sulphurous acid gases, both of which are effectual extinguishers of flame. The compound is said tohave been xperimentally tried by the Paris Firemen and with good results, since it is stated that within the space of three months they succeeded by its use in extinguishing 251 fires out of3i9, and that without deranging or damaging apartments in any way.
  • Two members of the St. Louis Pompier Corps, Neison and Ritz, had a very narrow escape from death at the late fire in Flesh & Work s paint shop. Neison, who with Ritz and several others was in the upper part of the building, stepped out upon a sign in order to better handle the hose which the men inside were dragging up. The sign broke, and left him hanging by the hose line. Ritz instantly caught his comrade’s leg, and amid splashing water and the fierce flames held him there until the latter was able to swing himself back into the window. A vast crowd saw the incident, and when the fearful moment was over, sent up a rousing cheer for the brave fellows.
  • The report of Fire Marshal Thompson, of Philadelphia, for 1378, just submitted to Mayor Stokley, of Philadelphia, shows that there were 713 fires, the loss being $.’,327,721.60, 63 fires and $609,103.60 greater loss than in 1877. The destruction of H. P. & W. P. Smith’s dry goods house and the Kettcrlinus block together aggregated $734,172. The loss altogether has been greater than that during any other year since 1872. 355 of the fires were caused by carelessness, 101 were accidental, 13 incendiary, 66 from coal oil, and 35 from fireworks, the rest being from spontaneous combustion, defective flues, heaters and unknown causes. There was one conviction for arson and one acquittal, and one case is still pending.
  • Ellicott Hook and Ladder Company, of Jamestown, N. Y., recently made the Hook and Ladder Company, of Ithaca—whose guests the Jamestown boys were last summer—a very handsome present as an appreciation of their hospitality. The gift is a solid silver vase made to order by Tiffany & Co., of New York. ‘Ihe vase itself is twelve an 1 one-half inches high, and rests upon an ebony base four inches high. On one side is engraved, “ Ellicott to Tornado, with kindest recollections of August 22, 1878.” Opposite this are the intertwined figures 1 and 3, and across them are the symbolic Hook and Ladder. At either side of this ornamentation are the monograms of each company, which, like the figures and emblem, are In relief and in imitation ol gold.

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