RANDOM SPARKS

RANDOM SPARKS

  • A big parade is contemplated by the Olean (N. Y.) Fire Department.
  • The annual election of officers in the West Ansonia (Conn.) fire district takes place on the evening of June 14.
  • The spring parade and inspection of the Southington (Conn.) Fire Department will take place on Saturday, June 12.
  • The village of Potosi, Wis., is now trying to incorporate for the purpose of securing more effectual protection against fire and whiskey.
  • The Redfield Hook and Ladder Company of Phelps, N. Y., will be the guests of the Rurasey Proteclives of Seneca Falls on parade day, June 24.
  • Wallingford, Conn., still retains some of her fire bugs. On June 2 a house and two barns were destroyed. The origin of the fire was incendiary.
  • The old Neptune Fire Company of Waverly, N. Y., will be represented by Joseph E. Hallett at the State firemen’s convention at Buffalo in August next.
  • The annual convention of the New York State Firemen’s Association will be held this year at Buffalo, August 17, 18, 19 and 20. The Exempt Firemen’s Association of that city has already taken action relative to the entertainment of their brethren from neighboring cities
  • who will be present on that occasion, and it is evident that no effort will be spared to make the occasion interesting and profitable to all participants.
  • The Firemen’s Mutual Aid Association of New Haven, Conn., have voted benefits to Oliver B. Allen of Steamer Company No. 5 and R. T. Elies of Hook and Ladder Company No. 3.
  • Christopher Serry of Meriden, Conn., who has been sick at Byxbee hose-house for several weeks, has so far recovered that he was removed to the residence of his uncle, Anthony Scaldon.
  • The parade of the Wtnsted (Conn.) Fire Department, under command of Chief Engineer Jesup, on May 31, was a very creditable affair, and the boys elicited applause all along the line.
  • It is reported that the Le Roy Hook and Ladder tug of war team has decided to attend the firemen’s tournament to be held at Brockport on June 12. They will also go to Albion on July 23 and 24.
  • A. Kinsheimer of Hook and Ladder Truck Company No. 14 of New York city, claims to be the champion pool-player of the fire department, and challenges any other man in the department for pleasure.
  • The Connecticut State Association has paid the sum of $36 to David Sheriden of Steamer Company No. 2 of Bridgeport, for injuries received while attempting to make the horses on the steamer do their duty at an alarm of fire, April 30.
  • At the annual election of Irving Hose Company No. 3 of Tarrytown, N. Y., the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Wm. Fallon, Jr., foreman ; Louis C. Odell, assistant foreman; Louis Gross, secretary; Wm. R. Odell, treasurer.
  • A complimentary banquet was tendered Councilman Daniel A. Logan, the retiring assistant foreman of Ever Ready Hook and Ladder Company of Meriden, Conn., on the evening of June 2, at which time his brother firemen presented him with a handsome marble clock, surmounted by a beautiful bronze figure.
  • The Chicago Times says: “The members of the Big Rapids (Mich.) Fire Department are again quarreling. There is said to be much bickering and jealousy, owing to a vote of the council to reduce the numerical strength. Chief Goldsborough has been asked to resign, but refuses to comply with the wishes of the council.”
  • The Iowa Firemen’s State Tournament opened a week’s session June 8 at Dubuque, with $3000 offered in prizes for feats of speed and quick work in handling machines and throwing streams. Indications pointed to a large crowd in attendance. Every city and town of prominence in the State had given notice that it would be represented by companies.
  • The new theatre in Derby, England, built only about a year ago, was completely destroyed by fire on May 5, before the commencement. The fire was caused by a gas explosion behind the stage, and there were about 200 persons in the different rooms of the building, who saved themselves in good order, although one actor was suffocated in the green room and one workman was killed by the falling in of the roof. The loss amounted to about $too,ooo.
  • The water-works of Aurora, Ill., include a stand-pipe, which is on the bank of the river some distance above the central portion of the city. At this point the water is pumped from the river, and is so soft as to be fit for washing purposes, though not as soft as rain-water. The foundation of the stand-pipe is about thirty-five feet higher than the business portion of the city, and itself 150 feet high. This makes the top of the stand-pipe about 1S5 feet higher than the business part of the city, and at that point gives a pressure of nearly eighty pounds. Steam is kept up day and night at a pressure of sixty pounds. About twenty miles of pipe have already been laid, reaching to nearly every part of the city. The total cost is $150,000.—Sandwich Gazette.
  • The most destructive fire which Stamford, Conn., has seen for a long time broke out late Tuesday night in the finishing room of Rippowam Woolen Mills, owned by W. C. Harding & Co., and situated on Mill river, on the west side of the borough. The mills consisted of one fourstory building, about 60 x 350, and several large brick additions. The establishment was supplied with the most improved machinery, valued at $150,000. Owing to the combustible nature of the buildings and their contents, the firemen were able to save nothing, and only the walls of the brick buildings remain standing. No official statement regarding the
  • total loss has yet been given, but estimates place it in the neighborhood of $250,000. The insurance is said to be heavy. The mills gave employment to about 400 persons, and have been largely the means of building up the section known as West Stamford. The establishment was running full time, eleven hours a day, and a large amount of stock was on hand. The business was established in 1S26 by Benjamin Matthews, and is one of the oldest in New England. It is probable that the factory will soon be rebuilt. The origin of the fire is unknown. It must have burned for some time before the alarm was given. Ten minutes after the alarm the building was one mass of flame.
  • On June 2 a party of young ladies climbed to the top of the fire bell tower, sixty feet high, at Aspen, Col., for the purpose of obtaining a good view of the city. Eppa Stewart stepped to the edge of the tower, and was leaning against a corner post looking over the country, when the janitor, not knowing the presence of the ladies, seized the bell-rope to call a meeting of the fire company. The sudden clang of the great bell startled Miss Stewart, and, losing her balance, she plunged from the dizzy height to the pavement. She was carried into a neighboring house, where it was discovered that both legs were crushed to such an extent that both feet were amputated within a few inches of the knees. Her left arm was broken to splinters, and five ribs on the right side were broken and torn loose from the spine. Her recovery was deemed impossible.
  • George Washington took a live interest in fire matters and it is on record that he was one of the founders of the Friendship Fire Company, which still exists, and when he first went to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia he bought a machine for the company for $400. He used to run to fires with it whenever he happened to be in town. It is remembered that a few months before his death he was riding through Alexandria, when the fire bells rang. He rode to the fire and was surprised to find that the machine was poorly, manned and very feebly worked, Riding up to a number of well-dressed men standing on the curb stone, he said : “Gentlemen, I am surprised to see you standing idle here ; it is your duty to lead in these matters.” With that he got off his horse and himself mounted the machine. It was well worked from that time on.
  • According to Dr. Siemens, large furnaces, on account of the nature of flame, must replace small ones. He claims to have proven that solid substances interfere with the formation of flame, and that flame injures solid substances with which it comes in contact. To account for the phenomena he advances, preferably, an electric hypothesis. Accordingly he explains flame as the result of an infinite number of exceedingly minute electrical flashes being due to the very swift motion of gaseous particles ; and a solid body which opposes itself to these flames is cut by them, while the motion being more or less arrested by the solid body, the flame is thus more or less subdued. Siemens insists, therefore, that flame must not be allowed to impinge on bodies to be heated, but must simply heat the bodies by radiation, and furnaces must be so coustrucled as to allow the flame to develop out of contact, not only with the substance on its bed but with the walls and roof of the furnace itself.—Phrenological Journal.
  • —The firemen’s tournament of the Albion (N. Y.) Department at the Fair Grounds, July 2 and 3, promises to be a glorious event. The forenoon of the first day will be devoted to the parade and review, in which it is proposed to have all visiting companies participate. Every county in Western New York is expected to be represented. A race for a lumber wagon ($60) will take place in the afternoon of the first day, to be competed for by teams of ten men, pulling a lumber wagon one quarter of a mile ; a tug of war, for first, $75, and second, $50 ; a bicycle race and a hose race, for first, $50, second, $25 ; a prize fireman’s drill for $40, and a bicycle race for a badge valued at $50. In the afternoon of the second day a road cart ($75) will be competed for by teams of four men each, running one-half mile. Fifty dollars will be given to the best uniformed company, and to the handsomest cart, $50. During the contests there will be interspersed minor races of an amusing kind, and Albion and visiting bands will furnish abundant music, and if fair weather prevails a good time may be looked for. In the evening of the last day a grand display of fireworks will close the festivities. Twenty-five cents will be the admission fee to the grounds, and the various committees of the steamer and Hose Company No. 2, under whose auspices it is, are sparing no effort to make the days enjoyable ones.

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