RANDOM SPARKS

RANDOM SPARKS

  • Scribner, Neb., is organizing a fire department.
  • John Swanson was reappointed fire marshal of Joliet, Ill., on Monday last.
  • Portland, Me., has voted to purchase a rotary steam fire engine, also to purchase a hose wagon.
  • We are indebted to The Boston Globe for several paragraphs of fire news published in this issue.
  • William Chrisman, chief of the fire department of Jeffersonville, Indiana, is lying at the point ot death.
  • Marine City, Mich., council has ordered the examination of public buildings with reference to fire escapes.
  • A Dubuque fireman has invented a contrivance by which he can light the fire in the furnace before leaving his bed.
  • Chief Hosley of Chicopee, Mass., this week purchased 800 feet of American jacket hose with the Hovey clutch coupling.
  • Lansingburgh, N. Y., is to have water-works, and the contract has been awarded to Sherman & McDonough of West Troy.
  • When Marquette, Mich., firemen do a good deed the city council sends around $3 apiece. It seems to encourage the boys.
  • The Pequoig Hose Company of Athol, Mass., have disbanded because of dissatisfaction with the appointment of engineers.
  • The Hartford Fire Commissioners organized May 6, with J. R Hill, president and Thomas R. Laughton, secretary, both re-elected.
  • The Gardiner, Mass., engineers-have adopted a signal code for the sections of the town, and an out-of-town call to be given on alarm whistle.
  • The Elgin, III., Fire Department has re-elected Theodore Schroeder chief marshal; Andrew Apple, first assistant, and John V. Schaller, second assistant. secretary and treasurer.
  • G. W. Straight sent $50 to the Firemen’s Benevolent Fund of the Chicago Department last week, in recognition of the services of the department at the recent fire in his furniture factory.
  • The selectmen of Manchester have%ppointed the following fire engineers for the present year: Charles H. Stone, John W. Carter, J. T. Stanley, Charles Sargent and Oliver T. Roberts.
  • The many friends of Charles E. Wadsworth of Chicago, the western sales agent of Erie Rubber Company, will be pleased to learn that he has nearly
  • recovered from his recent severe illness and is again able to be about, although he will not be able lor some time yet to take the road again. “ Waddy ” says he feels so much better ” that friends are kindly requested not to send flowers.”
  • The owners of one of the opera houses burned at Glens Falls, N. Y., on April 28. purpose to bring a suit against the village corporation for damages caused by its neglect to keep the water-works in proper repair.
  • At a meeting of the city council, Pekin, Ill., held May 9, the present fire department was disbanded. A paid department is to take their place. Chief Engineer August Winkel sent in his resignation, which was accepted.
  • Deluge Hose Company No. 1 of Keene, N. H., are to hold a grand picnic at the fair grounds, July 4. The same company recently presented P. O’Leary, its foreman for eight years, with a handsome gold watch and chain.
  • The Brookline, Mass., engineers have organized with G. H. Johnson, chief, and J. H. Allen, clerk. Assistant Foreman John Hutchinson was appointed to fill the vacancy on the board caused by the resignation of A. li. Kendrick.
  • Springfield, Mass., is reported by local fire insurance agents as hardly up to the times in the matter of protection from fire, as shown especially in the utter want of a protective department such as is found in other Massachusetts cities.
  • The Canton, Mass., Fire Company was recently reorganized with George C. Allen, foreman ; W. E. Peirce, first assistant; John Plunkett, second assistant; A. Lopez, Jr., clerk and treasurer, and Captain E. C. Murphy, steward.
  • At a recent meeting of the Denver Common Council Julius F. Pearse was nominated for fire marshal and elected. Thomas Downey was elected assistant fire marshal. For superintendent of fire alarm telegraph, Mr. Hinman was elected.
  • The Phoenix Fire Company No. 1 of Waterbury, Conn., celebrated their thirty-fith anniversary Monday evening last at their elegantly furnished quarters with a supper, served in the best manner possible, over 100 persons being present.
  • The Chicopee Falls, Mass., fire district report for the year ending April 30 shows five alarms, with a total loss of $1300. The apparatus consists of 1 hand engine and 1 hook and ladder truck, 40 hydrants, 6 reservoirs and 36 members. .
  • The Beverly Board of Engineers have organized, with Levi K. Goodhue, chief; G. H. Swan, first assistant and clerk; H. P. Pousland, H. W. Foster, Hugh Hill, R. H. Grant, A. Williams, T. Gliden and W. H. Woodbury, assistant engineers.
  • The first annual ball of the Millbury, Mass., Steam Fire Engine Company No. 1, May 1, was a grand affair, 130 couples participating. Firemen were present from Worcester, Oxford, Leicester and Grafion. Captain J. H. Ferguson was marshal.
  • The new water company at Great Barrington, Mass., has organized, and the plans are practically finished for the supply of water from Mansfield Pond. Engineer Keith will have the contract for constructing the works, and they will cost about $10,000.
  • Swampscott, Mass., has voted to introduce the telephone fire alarm service, which includes seven stations, at an expense of $245 per year; also to erect a bell tower and hang a bell on the Town Hall. The purchase of horses for the new steam firewngine was authorized.
  • At West Hoboken, at the annual election of the fire department for chief and assistant chief engineers, held May 5, the members elected Assistant Chief Levi A. Farr of Neptune Engine Company No. 1 for chief and John R. Muir of Columbia Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 as assistant.
  • The Isaac Little Hose Company No. 1 of Ilinghatn, Mass., have elected H. T. Howard, foreman ; Horace Peare, assistant foreman ; A. L. Whitton. clerk, and F. P. Dyer, treasurer. This company runs the first hose carriage ever built by the Abbott-Downing Company of Concord, N. H.
  • Northampton has adopted a novel code of fire alarm signals. They are struck on the alarm bell, which is first rung one minute, then the number of the street on which is the fire is struck in accordance with a printed list, and this is repeated twice. Seven blows will be given when the fire is out.
  • The Essex, Mass., fire companies have organized for the ensuing year as follows: Essex Company No, 2, foreman, Austin Andrews; assistant foreman, John F. Gilbert; clerk and treasurer, William G. Pierce. Amazon Company No. 3, foreman, Stephen Bartlett; assistant foreman, Luther E. Burnham ; clerk, Horace I. Story; treasurer, Edwin Hobbs.
  • A new hook and ladder company of Norwood was recently organized to man the new truck when it is placed in service. Its officers are: Foreman, Frank Walker; assistant foreman, Frank W. Turner, ex-foreman of Washington Engine Company No. r and a prominent member of the State Firemen’s Association ; clerk and treasurer, M. H. Howard.
  • The following on the question of fire departments from the pen of the Minnesota Insurance Commissioner is sound doctrine: “ To establish and properly maintain a fire department in cities like St. Paul and Minneapolis—i. e., to
  • manage and keep up a really first-class fire department—is an expensive thing, and yet there is no expenditure a municipality is called upon to make that is wiser, or which pays so well from a material point of view. Within the limits only of the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the department, such expenditure is eminently wise.”
  • Charles Manheim of Columbia Hook and Ladder Company No. x of West Hoboken was married to Miss Konert of the same town last Sunday evening. Foreman Haag presented, in the name of the company, an immense basket of the choicest flowers, with a congratulatory speech, to the happy bride. Mr. Manheim thanked the company and then invited them to a spread, to which the fire laddies did full justice.
  • The New York Commercial Bulletin says: “In investigating the loss of a small bam at Waverly, N. Y., insured in the Glens Falls Insurance Company, the origin was decided to be incendiary, and suspicion fell upon one Burt. An officer was promptly placed upon his track, who followed the young man to the home of his relatives near Port Allegheny, where he was about to make the arrest when Burt suicided by taking poison.”
  • At Hartford, Conn., there has been a conference between the fire and water commissioners regarding the placing of ioo additional fire hydrants in various sections of the city, and the water board favor the project, and think this number of hydrants can be put in without increasing the expense account more than $500,which can be accomplished by reducing the rates at present charged for the use of hydrants. The scheme is a good one and will meet with general favor.
  • John W. Reis, a well-known citizen of Chicago since 1837, died on the 9th inst. at his home, corner of I’wenty-ninth street and Cottage Grove avenue. Mr. Reis was foreman of Eagle Company No. 7, volunteer fire department, and he was afterward connected with the present paid department as assistant foreman of Engine Company No. 9. Escorts were furnished to attend the funeral, which took place last Sunday, from the fire department and also from the volunteer association.
  • The water supply of Savannah, Ga., has been greatly improved by the laying of new mains. There have been laid in all 11,250 feet of sixteen-inch, twelve-inch and ten-inch mains and 8000 feet of six-inch cross mains, equal to nearly four miles. These mains have had the eflcct of producing a better circulation over the whole city to the most distant points of delivery. Thirty-five fire hydrants have been added to the number already in use, some of them being of a new and superior pattern.
  • The Hudson, Mass., Fire Department has organized with Benjamin Dearborn, chief, and R. H. Brigham and William Moulton, assistant engineers. Eureka Engine Company No. 1—Foreman, C. P. Russell; first assistant, W. A. Gay; second assistant, F. W. Trowbridge; clerk, S. Bruce. Hose Company No. 1—J. P. Russell, foreman ; Silas Sawyer, assistant ; J. D. McKenzie, clerk. Truck Company No. 1—James Robinson, foreman; Frank Knights, assistant; J H. Witherbee, clerk. The department will parade Memorial Day.
  • Martin Bulling, a fireman living at No. 506 Thirtieth street, Chicago, lost his twenty-two months old son through a servant’s mistake. The little one had been ill for two days and a medicine had been prescribed for it. Mrs. Burling instructed the domestic to give the child its medicine, but by mistake the girl, who is quite young, administered carbolic acid and glycerine. The little one died shortly after in the greatest agony, all efforts to save its life being powerless.
  • John Ryan, a Chicago fireman, met with an accident last week which may result fatally. He was painting the front of Company No. 14s enginehouse on Chicago avenue, near Larrabee street, sitting on a hanging scaffold, when one of the supports gave way and threw him to the pavement, a distance of about thirty feet. Several bones were broken and he was badly injured internally. He was removed to his home at the corner of Archer avenue and Sanger street.
  • Mysterious fires have frequently been traced to the focalization of the sun’s rays by glass vases, fish globes, paper weights, etc., and now a writer in The American Architect adds to these a case where, in a room with a southern exposure. smoke was seen to be rising from a table covered with a woolen cloth on which stood an ink-well supported on four glass spheres. Upon investigation it was found that the spheres, acting as burning glasses, had focussed the rays of the sun so strongly as to scorch the cloth badly in several places.
  • Following are the officers of the different companies of the Fairhaven, Mnss., Fire Department: Contest Steam Fire Engine Company No. 3—Samuel E. McDonald, foreman ; Thomas Morse, first assistant; Charles F. Ryder, second assistant; Peleg Briggs, third assistant; J. A. Colwell, clerk. Relief Engine Company No. 5—M. P. Whitfield, foreman: J. W. Kempton, first assistant; J. K. Pauli, second assistant; J. M. Allen. Jr., clerk. Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 George Eldred, foreman ; Davis Sherman, assistant foreman ; Horace Sanders, clerk.
  • The several companies of Newburyport have elected officers as follows : Truck Company No. 1—L. R. Radigrass, foreman; W. A. Taylor, assistant; W. R. Phelps, clerk; A. C. Noyes, treasurer. J. S. Frost Hose Company No. 6—M. Berry, foreman; J. F. Rodigrass, assistant; W. H. Sumner, clerk ; G.
  • H. Fendersen, treasurer. Steam Fire Engine Company No. 3—A. P. Lewis, foreman ; E. W. Burk, assistant: A. W. Banks, clerk. Neptune Company No. 8— John Burke, foreman; J. F. Bryant, first assistant; D. W. Nutting, second assistant ; A. W. Porter, clerk.
  • The Fall River companies have elected the following foremen: Quequehon Steam Fire Engine Company No. I, John Darling; King Philip Steam Fire Engine Company No. 2, T. E. Lynch ; Metawmet Steam Fire Engine Company No. 3, Charles Terry ; Massasoit Steam Fire Engine Company No 5, Robert Fletcher ; Anowan Steam Fire Engine Company No. 6, Eli Irving; Pocasset Steam Fire Engine Company No. 7, A. J. Pember; Cascade Hose Company No. 1, F. W. Martland; Reindeer Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, G. H. Kelley; Antelope Hook and Ladder Company No. 2, Squire Davis.
  • On the night of December 15 a fire broke out in King Brothers’ store at Fort Smith, Ark., about midnight, the building and contents, besides several other adjoining structures, being consumed. King’s stock was insured in the Niagara Company for $8000, which the company refused to pay, claiming that the building was set on fire. King Bros, brought suit to recover the amount, and on trial the jury found a verdict for the defendants, and the two brothers, O. L. and Bert King, were arrested on a charge of arson and required to give a bond of $2500 each. The elder brother, O. L., gave the bond, while Bert had to go to jail.
  • Thomas Crowe of Chicago was arrested last Saturday and taken to Peoria to answer to an indictment just preferred against him for arson, it being charged that he burned his father’s barn on February 11, 1882, to get the insurance money of $350, the barn being valued at $100. Crowe is a son of Patrick W. Crowe, the dynamiter who was accused of inventing and making the infernal machines which were landed on English soil a year ago. Crowe at that time had a contract with the city of Peoria to light gasoline lamps in the suburbs. The barn was used only to store gasoline and lighting fixtures in. The accused was admitted to bail in the sum of $500.
  • The annual election of officers of the Waltham, Mass., Department resulted : Waltham Steam Fire Engine Company No. 1—A. J. Jackson, foreman ; W. D. Newland, assistant; M. W. Eaton, clerk. Independent Hose Company No. 1—E. A. Emerson, foreman ; F. A. Walker, assistant; C. C. Morgan, clerk. N. P. Banks Hose Company No. 2—G. H. Chapin, foreman; G. H. Pendexter, assistant; E. H. Brown, clerk. Parks Hose Company No. 3—T. K. Holbrook, foreman ; G. F. Carr, assistant; E. D. Donnell, clerk. Prospect Hose Company No. 4—R. A. Jones, foreman; J. L. Fairbush, assistant; W. E. Allen, clerk. Veteran Hook and Ladder Company No. 1—I. H. Bullard, foreman ; G. E. Winslow, assistant; G. E. Parmenter, clerk. Department chaplain, Rev. E. D. Donnell. With but few exceptions all are re-elected.
  • Fire Marshal Swenie issued a general order, Thursday, May 1, promoting Lieutenant Keynon to captain of Engine Company No. 13; Pipeman Holt of Engine Company No. 3 to lieutenant; Pipeman Hall of Engine Company No. 5 to lieutenant; John A. Stahle, truckman of Truck Company No. 5, to lieutenant; John Powers, truckman of Truck Company No. 2, to lieutenant of Engine Company No. 8, and Pipeman O’Niel of Engine Company No. 27 to lieutenant of Engine Company No. 33. Attached to the order was a paragraph forbidding members of the department from smoking in the streets or public places, and also from lounging on the sidewalk or in front of company quarters. The boys do not take very kindly to the new restrictions, but will obey them.
  • During the present year it is proposed to add to the efficiency of the Chicago Fire Department by the erection of two new engine-houses, the purchase of three new fire engines, and the formation of two new companies, one of which will be a hook and ladder company. The plans for the new engine-houses have been made, and bids are to be at once invited for the work. One of the houses will be located on Curtis street, near Randolph, and the other, the hook and ladder, on Halsted street, near Vedder. The new engines, which will be advertised for in a few days, are to be what is known as second-class machines, and it is calculated to have them delivered and in use inside of ninety days. One of them will be placed at the new Curtis street engine-house, and the other two are intended to take the place of two now in the department which have seen their best days.
  • In Massachusetts the Westfield Fire Department is organizing a base ball team. The Milford firemen will hold an eight days’ fair, beginning May 20. The Neptune Engine Company of Shelbum Falls have elected George Jones foreman. The Clipper Engine Company of Webster have elected A. P. Weeks to be foreman. The West Brookfield Board of Engineers for 1884 are Wm. Smith, chief; E. W. Combs, A. W. Beals, William Dane and J. G. Shackly, assistant engineers. The American Engine Company of the same place have elected Edward Wilber and the L. Fullan Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. A. W. Beals as foreman. The Orange Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 have elected W. S. Varney foreman and W. S. Davis assistant. Hickct Fire Company of Marblehead have elected John Pierce to be foreman. Salem firemen have elected the following company commanders: Victor Steam Fire Engine Company No. 3, C. H. Phippen, foreman ; Franklin Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, Frank T. Berry, foreman ; Hose Company No. 6, Thomas H. Rowell, foreman. Salem has ordered 1000 feet of Warwick hose and 1000 feet of Boston woven hose. About eighty couple par-
  • ticipated in the ball of Foxboro Steam Fire Engine Company No. x. Chief J. A. Ellison has been re-elected at North Andover. Natick re-elects J. M. Moore chief of department, Reuben Hunting, clerk, and Daniel Huntington, assistant engineer. Plymouth companies have organized with J. A. Maybury, foreman of Steamer Company No. I; W. H. Morton, foreman of Steamer Company No. a; J. F. Towns, foreman of Torrent Company No. 4 ; Joe Barnes, foreman of Truck Company No. 1. The fire engineers of Athol have chosen Charles Gray chief engineer and Almon Smith clerk and treasurer. A. P. Richardson and J. C. Blake are the other members of the board. G. A. Goodwin is foreman of Steamer Company No. 1 of Marblehead. John Paine is elected foreman of Liberty Hose Company.
  • —On the evening of May 8 the Boston Department had an ugly fire to contend with at Nos. 21, 23 and 25 Pearl street. However, by good management a serious conflagration was prevented. While the firemen were busily engaged in battling the flames on Pearl street, they appeared in the windows of the opposite building, No. 138 Congress street, occupied by the firm of Andrew J. Morse & Son, the fire having traveled through a wooden belt box which connects the two structures. A rush was made to cut them off, and while so engaged, Foreman Martin and Hoseman Smith of Chemical Company No. 2 were severely burned about the face, and Ladderman Flavel of Hook and Ladder Company No. 8 was blown down a flight of stairs, and received injuries in the back and leg. The firm of Frye, Phipps & Co., where the fire originated, have sent a check for $100 to the relief fund.
  • —The Providence Journal of May 10 gives this remarkable account of a mill that was fired by lightning, which, at the same time, started the automatic sprinklers with successful effect. During the storm of Friday morning, which raged with great force here, lightning ran by the telephone wire to the Winsor mill. There is no telephone in the mill and the wire is disconnected just outside the building. The fluid was led by the wire to the corner of the mule and weaving rooms, and entered the building under the jet. It followed the water pipe and set the sprinklers going and, at the same time, fired the stock in the males. By this singular provision of an active extinguishing agent at the moment the fire started serious loss was prevented, as the fire was soon drowned out. Mr. Armington, the superintendent, sleeps in the mill and he set the force pump at work and rang the bell for help. 1 hree persons responded, but the fire was under control when they arrived. The mule carriages were charred and some of the cotton scorched, but the damage is slight and can be repaired in a day. Several telephone poles were riven and prostrated during the shower.
  • —The action of the fire commissioners in prohibiting the fire companies from attending fires beyond the limits of the city is thoroughly justified by all circumstances. While the crossing of the city lines is prohibited, the board has vested power in the chief engineer to take such action in event of fire in any of the suburbs of the city as his judgment may dictate. For instance, there might be a fire on the west side of Prospect avenue, or below the city line in Wethersfield, or north on the Windsor road, or in East Hartford, for either of which an alarm might be turned in from a city fire box. That would call a portion of the deparment corresponding with the locality, but the response of the firemen would cease at the city limits. At that point the chief would use his discretion as to whether they should proceed or not. Of course no reasonable assistance would be refused anyone, but the safety and welfare of the city should be the first consideration in such important matters. There are instances where people have removed just outside the city for the purpose of avoiding taxation. Those who pay taxes and support the fire department have the first claim upon it, and the city can hardly be considered properly protected when the fire department or any part of it is out of its limits.—Hartford Times.

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