Reading Gas Producer Pumping Plant

Reading Gas Producer Pumping Plant

The accompanying illustrations arc exterior and interior views of the new gas producer pumping station at Reading, Pa., for supplying the high service district. The water is taken from springs and a small stream that furnishes the Engleman supply. The higher portions of the city are located along the western slope of Mount Penn and the northern slope of Neversink Mountain. It will be noted that the building is faced with tool-dressed granite lined on the interior with gray pressed bricks, ft was designed to accommodate three complete units of pumping machinery. The pump room is 25 ft. 3 in. by 46 ft. 3 in., and the producer room is 14 ft. 5 in. by 46 ft. 3 in., while the coal room is 17 ft. by 15 ft. 1 in. The ground in the rear of the station is elevated so that coal can be hauled in wagons to an elevated position in the rear of the coal room and dumped directly into the room from the wagons by means of chutes. A platform scale is provided alongside of the rear driveway for the weighing of the coal delivered at the plant. Under the pump room floor is an excavation containing the piping to and from the pumps and engines. The 12 in. suction pipe is connected outside of the building with a 12 in. distributing main of the intermediate service. From the suction main 6 in. pipes lead to each pump. It may be stated that the pumps discharge through 7 in. pipes equipped with air domes, check valves, relief valves, and gate-valves, into a 12 in. discharge pipe, which is so arranged that any section can be thrown out of service without interfering with the discharge through the other sections. The water passes through a 12 in. meter tube, then through the distribution system of the intermediate service into the distributing reservoir. The gas producer plant includes two 75 horsepower anthracite gas producers with a coke and spray scruber for each. The starting device consists of a 2 horsepower gasoline engine beltconnected to a blower with a pipe connection to each producer, also half-connected to an air compressor with pipe to two air tanks, and thence to the large engines and to the air chambers of the pumps. The gas piping from scrubbers to engine is so arranged that either engine can be supplied from either producer. The engines are 50-brake-horscpower horizontal producer gas engines and are direct-connected by means of friction clutches to 3 x 10 in. double-acting triplex pumps.

Each engine and pump is capable of pumping 750,000 gallons of water per day against a discharge pressure of 130 lb. per square inch from a suction pressure of 20 lb. per sq. in. It may be stated that the drainage area of the supply is 0.6 square miles and is located on the eastern slope of Mount Penn. The water is first collected in a settling basin, where much sand and some gravel and clay is collected after heavy storms. After leaving the settling basin the water flows into an impounding reservoir holding 6,990,000 gallons. The water after leaving the reservoir is filtered by means of open slow sand filters made necessary by possible pollution from numerous meetings held on the mountain side within the drainage area of the supply. After leaving the filters the water is not exposed to daylight until it is tapped at a fixture. The water passes through the distribution system into a distributing reservoir located on the western slope of Mount Penn. The distributing reservoir is covered with flat slab beam, girder and column construction of reinforced cement concrete. The amount of water derived from this source in the last four fiscal years ranged from 95,128,270 gallons to 115,450,597.

SERVICE DRIVE IN REAR OF HIGH SERVICE PUMPING STATION, READING, PA.

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