RECOMMENDS UNIVERSAL METERAGE FOR NEWARK.

RECOMMENDS UNIVERSAL METERAGE FOR NEWARK.

In a recent issue of the Newark, N. J., “News,” in commenting editorially on a proposition for universal meterage in the city, said: “While it is not denied that Newark in a few years will need new sources of water supply, the report of Chief Accountant David Holmes of the water department indicates that much may be done to avert the danger of scarcity in the near future by wisely conserving the present supply.” Continuing the “News” says: “The plan is simply to cut off present waste of water by requiring the universal use of meters. This would not mean any additional expense to water consumers unless they were inexcusably careless or extravagant in the use of water. It would mean a big saving to the city in the amount of water consumed. According to the figures presented by Mr. Holmes the city in 1914 received $980,665 for 6,909 million gallons of metered water and only $321,320 for 8,304 million gallons of unmetered water. In other words, for onefifth less water it received more than three times as much money. Twenty-five thousand metered houses and factories returned more than three times as much revenue as 19,000 unmetered places and consumed 2,500 million gallons less water. With a meter a consumer pays for the amount consumed and is careful to avoid waste. In the absence of a meter there is a feeling of freedom to indulge in the extravagant use of water because the cost is the same whether much or little is consumed. The meter rate for householders is based upon a liberal allowance for family needs and so is the unmetered rate. In the former case this alowance is rarely exceeded because if it is the cost increases In the latter case there is no incentive to care and economy, because waste makes no difference to the consumer’s pocketbook. The rate of consumption per day for metered users is 764 gallons and for nonmetered 1,196. As practically all factories, large users of water, arc metered, the average for family consumption is certainly much less than 764 gallons. The non-metered use includes building operations, fire service and street flushing as well as private families, but even with these it seems certain that the consumption in non-metered private houses is at least double that in metered. Since the present daily consumption is about 45,000,000 gallons, if the above figures are correct, the universal installation of meters would be equivalent to adding several millions of gallons daily to the present water supply, or sufficient to provide for the needs of thousands additional population. By all means let us ma! quate provision for the future L. Korner, of meanwhile why not take _____urne, of Asheville, wasteful use of the of Atlanta; D. L. CasGa.; R. D. Korner, of Rock have?” Plane, Columbia, S. C.

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