Repairing a Submerged Pipe.

Repairing a Submerged Pipe.

A local paper of Galveston, Tex., gives the following description of repairing a water main under the bay to Pelican Island. It says the anchor which caught in the pipe has been cut away and that this is the second anchor that went foul of the water main, and which aggravated the trouble of leaky joints. Notwithstanding two large signs on either side of the channel warning vessels not to cast anchor in this vicinity mariners have ignored the warning and effected anchorage, but two lost their anchors by the experience. The strain produced by the anchors pulling on the pipe line opened the flexible joints in the water main and the work of repairing the damage consists of recaulking the joints with lead The pipe line is 42 feet under water, and the work is done by a diver, who remains under the water for three and four hours at a time Only one man can work on the job and with 42 feet of water above him conditions are not favorable for rapid work Lead is supplied to fill the leaky joints and there are about 140 joints in the line, most of which leak more or less. The project is new to this section of the country and quite interesting of those who care to study the methods of repairing employed. The leaks are located by the aid of an air pump stationed on a barge at the island end of the water main, which is to supply fresh water for the government quarantine station and federal immigration station on Pelican.

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