REPORT ON FIRE-STREAM DEMONSTRATION AT WASHINGTON.

REPORT ON FIRE-STREAM DEMONSTRATION AT WASHINGTON.

In the early morning of August 4, ten companies of the Washington fire department were called out for a practice fire-stream drill. The location chosen was at the junction of Louisiana avenue and Seventh street, not far from the centre of the mercantile district. Seven engine companies responded, of which engines 2, 6 and 14, extra first-size Metropolitan, and engine 16, a second-size Metropolitan, all drew their water from a cistern at the point above mentioned, while the other three engines, Nos. 1, 3 and 13, of the first and second sizes, attached to three hydrants close at hand. For the first exhibit, four 150-ft. lines of 254-in. hose were led off from each of the three extra-first-size engines, while three similar lines were attached to each of the four smaller engines. Twenty-four 1-in. nozzles, arranged with military precision in a formidable battery across Louisiana avenue, served to discharge the water, the twenty-four parellel jets making a striking display. As everything worked with perfect smoothness, the streams were shut down, after playing for seven or eight minutes. Nozzle-pressures were taken at all the streams, except those from engine 6. Pressures ran from 36 to 84 lbs., indicating from 170 to 280 gals, in each stream. The different engines were credited with the following amounts: Engine I, 809 gals, per minute; engine 2, 769; engine 3, 771; engine 6, unknown—probably over 800; engine 13. 583; engine 14, 941; engine 16, 529. Maximum draught on water supply, estimated, 5,300 gals, per minute. During the period of maximum draught, the water-level in the cistern gradually dropped a few inches, but promptly rose to its former level, as soon as the smallest of the four engines drawing from the cistern was shut down. The cistern was fed by two taps of 6-in. and 4-in. respectively, connecting with the 12-in. main in Pennsylvania avenue. The hydrants used were fed by 6-in. mains, with comparatively few cross-connections. For the second exhibition, the three larger engines were connected by twelve 200-ft. lines of hose to the 75-ft. Champion water tower. Streams were first played from the 2-in. water tower nozzle fully elevated, and from a 2j4-in. turret-nozzle mounted on the deck of the tower. Nozzle-pressures indicated about 800 and 1,800 gals, per minute in the two streams. A second 254-in. turret-nozzle was then opened, without materially increasing the total discharge. For the third test, engines 1, 2, 6, 13 and 14 each played a 2-in. stream from a turret-nozzle mounted on its respective hose wagon. Three 200-ft. lines were led from each engine. Nozzle-pressures indicated the discharge to be as follows; Engine 1, 695 gals, per minute; engine 2, 900; engine 6, 910; engine 13, 720; engine 12 940. The test lasted about five minutes. The cistern from which engines 2, 6 and 14 were taking about 2,750 gals, per minute continued to overflow throughout the test. For the final exhibition, engines 2, 6 and 14 combined to play three streams from Hart ladder-nozzles mounted on aerial trucks A, C and D. The streams were entirely satisfactory. As a whole, the tests were run off with unusual smoothness, reflecting highly upon the good discipline of the department. The absence of untoward occurrences such as burst hose, misunderstandings, delays and confusions was noteworthy. The exhibition showed the advantage which lies in supplementing hydrants by wellsupplied .cisterns, when it is desired to concentrate a large number of streams with comparatively short lines of hose.

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