REPORTS OF THE PAST YEAR.

REPORTS OF THE PAST YEAR.

London, England.—The report of the chief officer of the Fire Brigade for 1881 has been issued, from which it appears that the number of calls for fires, or supposed fires received during the year was 2376. Of these 240 were false alarms, 145 proved to be only chimney alarms, and 1991 were calls for fires, of which 157 resulted in serious damage and 1824 in slight damage. The fires of 1881 compared with those of 1880 show an increase of 120, and compared with the average of the last ten years an increase of 351. The number of fires in the metropolis in which life was seriously endangered was 107, and the number in which life was lost 29. The number of persons seriously endangered by fire was 154, of whom 114 were saved, and 40 lost their lives. The number of journeys made by the Fire Engines of the fifty-three land stations was 28,441, and the total distance run 62,904 miles. The quaniity of water used for extinguishng fires was 17,232,682 gallons, or about 76,931 tons. The strength of the Brigade at present is as follows: Fifty-three land fire engine stations, 11 movable land stations, 121 fire escape stations, 4 floating stations, 3 large land steam Steam Fire Engines, 33 small land Steam Fire Engines, 78 six-inch manual Fire Engines, 37 under sixinch manual Fire Engines, 137 fire escapes and long scaling ladders, 3 floating Steam File Engines, 2 steam tug-, 4 barges, 29 Hose Cars, 15 vans, 2 trollies, 53 telegraph lines, 7 telephone lines, 7 fire alarm circuits, with 14 call points, 536 Firemen, including Chief Officer, Second Officer, Superintendents and all ranks. The report states that the fire alarm circuits have been of great service, though the men are often harassed by false alarms through them.

REPORTS OF THE PAST YEAR.

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MISCELLANY

REPORTS OF THE PAST YEAR.

Ithaca, N. Y.—Three Steamer Companies, I Hook and Ladder Company, 3 Hose Companies, and I Company of Protective Police; 382 men. Expenses o( the year, $3736. Number of fires, 9. Property destroyed, $1611.

Burlington, N. J.—Force of the Department, 253 men. The apparatus consists of two Steam Fire Engines, one Hook and Ladder Truck, one Chemical Engine, and four hand Hose Carnages. The water supply is ample. There were 22 fires. A Relief Association is sustained.

Cortlandt, N. Y.—Apparatus, I third-class Steamer, 1 Hand Engine, 1 Hook and Ladd r Truck, and three Hose Carts. There were 5 alarms and two actual fires. A Company of Protective Police do g od service. Chief Plumb recommends ihe putchase ol a new Steamer. Fire losses in 1881 were much less than the year before.

Danville, III.—Number’and causes of fires: Defective ventilators, 2 : sparks from chimneys, 1; overheated stoves, 2 ; children playing with matches, 1 ; ash barrel, 1; defective furnace, 1; incendiarism, 1; total, 9. Insuiance involved, $17,323; insurance paid, $1,089. The Fire Department of Danville consists of a Chief and 6 paid men, of whom 2 are Drivers, 1 Engineer, 1 Stoker, and 2 Call men. Apparatus and equipment in first-class condition. Population, 8,000.

Montgomery, Ala.—Active members of the hire Department, 220; honorary members, 173, composing Mechanics Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1; Dexter Fire Com] any, No. 1; Alabama Fire Company, No. 2 ; Grey Eagle Fire Company, No. 3; Lomax Fire Company, No. 4. Number of alarms of fire in 1881, 43. The equipment of the Department was added to during the year, and now includes all modern improvements. The amount of money expended for new apparatus and for maintenance of the force was $11,298. The Department attended five fires in one day, all of which were of incendiary origin. L. Young is Chief. The population cf Montgomery is about 20,000.

London, Ont.—Total running expenses, $5698; permanent improvements, $3,109 ; number of fires attended, 61; apparatus used at 36, and 23 fires extinguished without unpacking. Average amount ot hose used at each fire, 400 feet; Insurance at risk, $184,509; total loss, $89,150; insurance paid, $28,000. More than two-thirds of the total loss was caused by three fires. Chief of Department John A. Roe attributes a great deal of the credit which he might attach to himself to London’s splendid system of Water-works, which gives unlimited and powerful streams to back up the efforts of the Fire Department. The Department now consists of 19 men, who are classified as follows : 1 Chief of Department, 1 Foreman, 1 Assistant Foreman, x Electrician, 2 Drivers and 1 Hoseman, who devote their whole ti re to the service, and 8 first-class and 4 second-class men, who are required to do fire duty only, bix additional men were appointed in May last, it having become apparent that the force, as then constituted, being cSmposed of only 13 men, was entirely too weak to handle a large fire successfully.