RESERVOIR CAPACITY AT DULUTH.

RESERVOIR CAPACITY AT DULUTH.

The construction of the new reservoir at the extreme westerly extremity of the city of Duluth, Minn., has been completed. Its capacity is 10,000,000 gals., with dimensions as follows: Size at top of coping, 344×280 ft.; size of bottom, 240×180 ft.; vertical depth at sides, 23 ft. 9 in. The city now has stored in its three reservoirs a reservoir supply of about 28,000,000 gals. A double line of pipe has been laid to the new reservoir, one line to to used as a supply pipe, the other as a return-flow’ to the West Duluth territory. By means of these pipes a constant circulation will be kept up and the purity of the water will likewise be preserved. The new reservoir has been built at the same elevation as the main reservoir at Thirty-fourth avenue East, and fills itself by gravity. A 12-in. main connects it with the system on Grand avenue in West Duluth. The only objection that can be urged against the reservoir is that the flow of w’ater through the pipe is too slow, and some means must be found to make it more rapid. Owing to the slowness of that flow, the village of Proctor Knott, to supply which with 1.000,000 gals, of water daily a contract with the city is desired, cannot at present have that desire fulfilled. During the year has been completed the water system on Duluth Heights. Four 6-in. wells w’ere driven, discharging into a receiving basin, from which the water is pumped, and a flow of water amounting to 82,000 gals, in twenty-four hours has been obtained—three or four times more than sufficient to meet all present demands of that district. A gasoline engine was installed and a tank of sufficient capacity erected to supply all of the needs of the people in that territory for some time to come. Lines of pipes were laid to reach all of those who had petitioned for the improvement. A pressure of about 70 lbs. to the sq. in. is had at any point on the pipe-lines, so that the people are now well supplied with fire protection. The entire cost of the improvement was $19,088.38. This district has been paying revenue to the department since October 1, 1906. The water is forced through 2,071 ft. of 10-in. pipe to an elevated tank, ihg’/i ft. above the pump. The pump is a gasoline combined engine and pump, 20-horsepower, with a rating of 287 gals, per minute. The elevated tank has a capacity of 60,000 gals, and is located at the highest point in the district at an elevation of 50 ft. above ground. The receiving tank at the pump has a capacity of 24,000 gals. An attempt was made to extend the system from Duluth to the Park Point territory. It was unsuccessful, owing to difficulties encountered in trying to install the pipe across the canal. The connection was made; but a break occurred, owing, it was said, to a vessel dragging her anchor over the pipe-line. The pumping at Lakewood has been contracted for by the Great Northern Power company, which will do the work by electric power as soon as the necessary pump can be installed. The water board will pay the company at the rate of $6.50 per 1,000,000 gals., so long as the consumption does not exceed 6,000,000 gals, per day, to be gradually decreased to $5.50, when the consumption reaches 15,000,000 gals, per day. This contract will save the city annually $3,500 on the present basis of consumption. The General Electric company will build and install a centrifugal electric pump of 12,000,000 gals, daily capacity. Its cost, with pipe to operate it, will be about $25,000. The present pumps will be kept in condition so that, if the emergency should arise, they may be operated at any moment. The 12-in.— 4-in. lines of pipe completed during 190(1 amounted to 31,055 ft. at a cost of $47,347-33The aggregate pipeage of the plant is 84 miles and 5,014 feet of 42-in.—3-in. pipes. Three hundred and twenty-five feet of 6-in. kalomine pipe was discontinued during the year. When the city bought the plant, the pipeage of the system was forty miles. The city now owns eighty-four miles of water pipe. Service extensions—the connections from the mains to private premises—have increased from 2,246 to 5,500. The hydrant rates have been reduced $20 for each hydrant installed since May 1, 1904. As to the water rates paid: In the framing of the new charter a clause was added requiring an appropriation from the tax levy of not less than one-half mill and not more than one and one-half mill, to be paid into the water and light plant fund to be used “exclusively in the reduction of water rates.” The receipts from this source up to January 1, 1907, have amounted to $80,338.88. The reductions made by the board in the water rates to consumers aggregate the sum of $517,911.24. Had not this clause m the charter been adopted, this aggregate would have been made just $80,338,88 less than it was, so that this sum received annually from the tax levy is considered as water rates and as much a part of the earnings as rates derived from private consumption. The manager of the water department is L. N. Case, who also manages the gas department with equal ability.

Supt. L. N. Case, Duluth, Minn.
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