Retirement of Chief Edward F. Croker.

Retirement of Chief Edward F. Croker.

As announced in these columns last week, Chief Edward F. Croker will sever his connection with the New York fire department on May 1, having tendered his resignation to Commissioner Waldo a few days ago. In accepting the resignation the commissioner writes as follows: “You have served the city for twenty-seven years efficiently and honestly. I feel that you merit every consideration that can he shown you by the city. 1 have, therefore, directed that you he placed on the pension roll of this department with an annual pension of $li,0nn for the remainder of your life. I avail myself of this opportunity to assure you of my highest regards and to wish you every success.” Ordinarily the retiring chief would lie entitled to a pension of hut $5,000, hut as an evidence of appreciation of the meritorious service which he had rendered the city. Commissioner Waldo tacked on an extra $1,000. Chief Croker was born forty-eight years ago, and was intended for the calling of a railroad man. His uncle, Richard Croker, however, persuaded him in 18*4 to enter the Fire Department. He was made assistant foreman within two months, and in two years foreman of a company, became a battalion chief in 1 *;!2, and after having served as deputy chief for seven years, succeeded the late Hugh Bonner as head it the department, after passing the necessarycivil service examination at which he was the only candidate, with a percentage of 07.

During the Seth Low mayoralty, Commissioner Sturgis finding that Croker would not acquiesce in all his orders removed the chief. The latter carried his case to the courts with the result that after a year Croker was reinstated with his back salary and court costs. Since then Chief Croker has won an enviable reputation as one of the most skilful fire fighters in any country. Upon learning of his resignation, Mayor Ciaynor offered Chief Croker an additional $2,000, thus making his salary $12,000, if he would remain at the head of the fire department. Backed by a number of business men the retiring chief will he at the head of the Chief Croker Fire Preventing and Engineering Company, the bureau to he completely equipped for the purpose of carrying out his plans of lire prevention and keeping down fire waste. He has also accepted the chairmanship of the Section of F’ire Prevention of the American Museum of Safety. His first work will he to equip an exhibition hall with all manner of devices for preventing fire. The exhibit will be for the use of employers and owners of factories and work shops who may there see practical demonstration of safety devices. A manual of safety for use in mills and factories will he prepared in various languages and distributed. Deputy Chief John Kenlon, who superintends the marine section of the city’s fire department, will temporarily act as chief.

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