Retrogressive Houston

Retrogressive Houston

It will be remembered that after the big fire with which Houston, Tex., was visited last February, shingle roofs were prohibited practically in all the congested and closely built-up portions of the city. Since that time there has been almost a continent-wide movement in the direction of fire prevention—a measure into which such a prohibition as the above enters largely, but apparently not at all so far as Houston is concerned, if at least a new ordinance that has been introduced into the city council is any criterion. The object is by no means to restrict to any considerable extent, but rather to enlarge the area affected by the prohibition against shingle roofs. According to its provisions large selections of closely built-up dwellings, whose burning, if a fire broke out among them, would threaten the safety of the whole city, may roof with shingles the houses that stand within their limits. This method of procedure if adopted, has been inaugurated at a very unfitting season—just as insurance rates are being reduced and a much lower key-rate for Houston is looked for. The insurance companies are alive to the inconsistency thus manifested by the municipal authorities, and by taking vigorous steps against it may possibly avert the passage of the ordinance. Meanwhile it is a matter of no small astonishment that the lesson which was literally burned into the citizens of Houston last February should have been so soon forgotten.

Previous articleDeath of Eli Bates, Former Chief of New York Fire Department
Next articleSource of the Butte Water Supply

No posts to display