Rules for Preventing Automobile Fires

Rules for Preventing Automobile Fires

Owing to the large number of automobile fires which have occurred at Memphis, Tenn., recently, Chief McFadden, of that city, has issued the following advice to automobile owners and chauffeurs for preventing fires: A large number of all automobile fires could be avoided by a little extra caution on the part of motorists. Backfiring, caused by a lean mixture of gasoline, is the principal cause of all auto fires. In cases of back-fire, a sheet of flame comes from the air intake of the carburetor. If there is anything inflammable in that vicinity it is apt to take fire. Another source of trouble is gasoline vapors in the drip pan. A hole should be made in the pan so that the gasoline will drain off before it has time to vaporize. Leaks in the gasoline pipe line should be watched closely. A redhot exhaust pipe is another source of trouble. The exhaust pipe is usua’ly placed near the wood of the car and fires frequently occur from opening the muffler “cut-out.” This is particularly dangerous when the car is in the garage, where grease and oil are spilled around on the floor. Sometimes in filling the gas tank the gasoline overflows and drips down. The motorist opens the muffler to start. Sparks fly out, the gasoline dripping from the tank ignites, and fire results. Short-circuiting of ignition and lighting wires is frequently the cause of disastrous fires. It should not be nccsary to suggest that automobile owners always carry fire extinguishers so that flames may be attacked promptly.

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