Rumor That Chief Seyferlich Is to Resign

Rumor That Chief Seyferlich Is to Resign

The Chicago American of recent date contained the following, concurring in the retirement of Chief Seyferlich from the fire department of that city: “Chief Charles F. Seyferlich will resign as head of the Chicago fire department within the next 60 days. Advanced years and ill health will be given as the reasons for the resignation, which will be accepted by Mayor Carter H. Harrison. The resignation will probably be the prelude to a general shake-up of the fire department, although Mayor Harrison would not say that today. Neither has the mayor determined who will be Seyferlich’s successor. Big Tom’ O’Connor, first assistant fire marshal, is in line for the place, but, under the civil service law, the mayor may give it to any one of the ten assistant marshals. The administration has had plans for the reorganization of the fire department under consideration for some time. Not very long ago a committee from the board of fire underwriters, headed by Charles H. Bishop, who has offices in the Insurance Exchange building, called on the mayor. This committee, which was introduced to the mayor by Oscar F. Mayer, complained that the fire losses in Chicago had been multiplying at an alarming rate for a vear or more, and that it was their belief that some radical step should be taken. Following this interview the mayor made a quiet inquiry of his own into conditions in the department. He also went over a lot of figures that were submitted by the underwriters, show ing the increase in fire losses since the death of Fire Chief James Horan. This inquiry convinced the mayor that there should be certain changes. Chief Seyferlich was called into conference, and it is said that he himself made the suggestion that it might be best for him to retire from the marsnalship in favor of some younger and more active man. It had been suggested that, as assistant marshal, which position he held for many years, he had given most of his time to office work of a more or less routine character, and that he had gotten out of touch with the real work of fighting fires. Chief Seyferlich was asked to-day about his expected resignation, but he refused to talk about it.”

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