SACRAMENTO, CAL., FIRE DEPARTMENT.

SACRAMENTO, CAL., FIRE DEPARTMENT.

To maintain the fire department of Sacramento,Cal., during the past year has cost $31,989.80, of which $26,450 was expended on salaries paid to the uniformed permanent men ,consisting of one chief engineer one assistant, one superintendent of fire alarms, three engineers, eight drivers, and two tillermen, and call men, consisting of three foremen of engine companies, with three assistants, one foreman of hook and ladder company, twenty-four hosemen, and five hook and laddermen. There are in service three Amoskeag engines, two hose wagons, one hose cart, one Hayes hook and ladder extension truck—second-class, one Kimball hook and ladder truck, and one buggy for chief. In reserve are one Clapp and Jones engine—second-class, three hose carts, and one buggy for chief. Of hose there are 6,200 feet cotton rubber-lined, of which 4,900 is in first-class condition and 1,300 in secondclass condition. The department owns sixteen horses. The total number of box alarms was eighty-seven: of telephone calls, twenty-four; of stills, one. The total amount of insurance involved in fires was $243,785; total loss on buildings, $25,871; total insurance paid on buildings, $20,485.67; total loss paid on personal, $8,933.72. Chief Guthrie calls the attention of the board of city trustees to the danger of wires supported by poles, which often renders it Impossible for the firemen to raise the ladders on account of the number of wires running in front of buildings.

SACRAMENTO, CAL., FIRE DEPARTMENT.

SACRAMENTO, CAL., FIRE DEPARTMENT.

Chief Guthrie, of the Sacramento, Cal., fire department states in his annual report that the total cost for the maintenance of the department for the year was $31,989.80, of which $26,000 was paid to officers and members, 52 in number. The fire-loss to buildings was $26,025,81, of which $19,7g4.67 was covered by insurance; to personal property, $20,346.82, insured for $8,933.75. There were three fatalities during the year, the victims in each case being women. Chief Guthrie calls the attention of the board of trustees to the great peril arising from the numerous telephone and telegraph wires supported by poles. The chief danger, the report says, lies in the liabilities of the light conductors conveying a portion of the heavy current which they carry into buildings, causing fire and probable loss of life. Again, they are an obstruction to firemen while in the performance of their duties, and it is recommended that they be placed under ground. He also insists upon the necessity for a chemical engine, and the construction of a trunk main along certain streets, so as to afford the residents in the southeastern portions of the city ample protection from fire. The construction of cisterns at various locations in the city is also advocated.

Mystic lake, Boston, is nearly dry. Those living round it claim its present condition threatens the health of the community. This lake is only a storage basin and its use will be discontinued in two years more when the water of the Nashua river will be turned into basin 5. at Southboro. This basin, in all probability, will be ready for the storage of water this winter, and in the following year will supply the cities now taking Mystic.