Safety Snap for Bit.

Safety Snap for Bit.

So many accidents and much trouble have arisen from driving apparatus to fires without having the bit in the horses’ mouths that a remedy had to be devised to prevent the evil. It is customary when a horse is eating to take the bit out of its mouth and snap it to the headstall, letting it hang behind the animal’s jaw. By so doing a sore is often caused, and the horse’s usefulness is interfered with thereby. To overcome that trouble, the safety-snap, as shown in the accompanying illustration, should be used. It is the invention of W E. Ritter, of No. 5 engine company, Norfok, Va., and has been approved by Chief J. II. Kegebein, of that city’s fire department. Without the safety-snaps, the reins are often snapped to the bit, under the impression that it is in the horse’s mouth, when, in reality, it is hanging behind bis jaw. The horse is then driven without being under proper control. That is obviated by the use of the safetysnap. When the horse is eating, the bit is taken out of his mouth and snapped alongside of the headstall (as shown in the illustration), out of the way of his jaw and everything else. If an alarm of fire should come in before the horse has finished eating, and he goes under the harness, the collar is snapped, and a start is next made to snap the reins to the bit, which is then hanging by the bit-snap but alongside of the headstall, and not in the animal’s mouth. It is then looked for. found and put there. The reins are snapped and everything is ready for the start, with the bit where it should be.

SAFETY SNAP USED IN NORFOLK FIRE DEPARTMENT.

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