San Diego Adds More Motors

San Diego Adds More Motors

A new motor-driven combination pumping engine has been added to the fire department of San Diego, Cal., and it is said that three more are being built for delivery in a few months. The one recently tested came fully up to the standard and has been accepted. Among the interested officials present were: Mayor James F. Wadham, Superintendent of Fires A. F. Dodson, W. J. Gorham, president of the Gorham Engine Co., of Oakland, which built the powerful apparatus; F. W. Ayers, the company’s operator; W. L. Forward, its designer, and A. J. Coffey, of San Francisco, a representative of the Gamewell fire alarm system. The San Diego Union says: “The first test was for endurance, and for more than two hours, with the big six-cylinder motor running at full speed, a terrific stream of water, drawn directly from the harbor by means of the six-inch intake pipe, was shot out again over the water in a stream rising to a height of fifty feet and reaching 300 feet or more. The next test was applied by hooking up three lines of hose, totaling nearly 1,000 feet in length, and discharging through one nozzle by means of a Siamese coupling. The standard set by the underwriters called for a nozzle pressure of 94 pounds to the square inch, which means a flow of 750 gallons a minute. The test lasted twenty minutes and the engine threw as high as 858 gallons a minute, not once falling below the standard. This was succeeded by a test requiring three streams to be thrown through one-inch hose nozzles. The next test is one which, according to the manufacturers, cannot be met by any but this make of engine. While the engine is running at full speed, the flow of water is shut off at the nozzle. By an ingenious arrangement this action automatically slows down the engine, and when the nozzle is turned on again the motor is again automatically speeded up. In every other type of pumping engine, say the manufacturers. shutting off the water at the nozzle will clog the engine and cause it to stop. It is declared that fire fighters will find this arrangement of the greatest advantage in actual work, as it will enable the nozzle man to shut off the flow of water at any time it becomes necessary for him to lay aside the hose for a moment. He can then return to it and turn on the stream again without delay.”

No posts to display