SANITARY PROTECTION OF WATER SUPPLIES.

SANITARY PROTECTION OF WATER SUPPLIES.

Superintendent Kenneth Allen in a recent paper on “The sanitary protection of water supplies,” devoted himself principally to showing that typhoid fever is the most serious result of impure supplies. “The importance of full and reliable statistics of typhoid (he said) in both cities and country is evident. Any abnormal increase of the disease is the best possible warning of danger. Stream pollution is becoming a pressing question in the thickly settled parts of this country, as it has been for some time abroad. It is one requiring broad and judicial treatment. The questions of a legal and scientific nature involved cannot be safely hft to public opinion. Experience w-ould seem to indicate that responsibility should be invested in a competent board, which should cooperate with local health officers and waterworks officials. All cities will eventually be forced either to obtain an unpolluted source of supply or purify the existing source.”

J }V. Jennings, the newly chosen chief of the Goldfield. Nev., fire department was recently seized upon the main street of Goldfield at four o clock in the afternoon by six men, presumably sympathisers of the Miners’ union, and, after a severe struggle, was led out of town and turned loose on the plains with his face toward Tonopah and told never to show himself in Goldfield again, on penalty of death. Jennings is generally popular. and much ill-feeling has been generated by his deportation. He had expected trouble, and had said that he would refuse to leave unless compelled to do so. He was said to have served in General Bell’s militia against the miners at Cripple Creek.

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