SCENE FROM THE GREAT FIRE OF LONDON.

SCENE FROM THE GREAT FIRE OF LONDON.

The inset which accompanies this number of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING represents an incident that occurred during the great fire of London, which broke out in Pudding Lane in that city on Sunday, September 2, 1666, and burned until the following Thursday, when it was apparently extinguished, only to break out again at the Temple, where its course was finally stopped by blowing up the adjoining buildings. The course of the conflagration was marked by the destruction of 13,200 houses, eighty-seven churches, six chapels, the Royal Exchange, the Custom House, Newgate jail, the Guildhall, and four bridges—leaving the whole space between the Temple and the Tower a mass of blackened ruins.

The picture which is reproduced today was painted by Stanhope H. Forbes and presented by the Sun fire office of London to the Royal Exchange in that city. It represents a scene described by Pepys in his diary, where he speaks of “everybody endeavoring to remove their goods, and flinging them into the river or bringing them into lighters as they lay off: poor people staying in their houses as long as the very fire touched them, and then running into boats or clambering from one pair of stairs by the waterside to another.”

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