School Fire at Rochester

School Fire at Rochester

Leaking gas it is thought was the cause of the fire which destroyed school building No. 14 in Rochester, N. Y., on January 4. The fire was discovered at about 10.30 P. M. by a passing citizen who immediately turned in an alarm which was followed by two more sent in from different boxes by others who saw the flames shooting from the windows of the building. When Chief Little and his men arrived on the scene the interior of the structure, which was built of brick with wooden floors, was a mass of flames. Although there were a number of dwellings in close proximity to the burning building, the firemen managed to keep the flames from spreading to any of these. The apparatus in service at the fire consisted of nine engines, thirteen hose wagons, four ladder trucks and one salvage wagon. The water tower responded but was nor used. A 12-inch main in the street, which is 40 feet wide, in front of the building supplied the 16 available 6-inch double hydrants, the pressure being 50 pounds. The largest number of streams thrown at one time was 25, of which 18 were engine and the other 7 plugs. About 10,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were used with 1⅛and 1 5/8-inch nozzles. The city has a gravity water system and a good steady pressure was furnished. The burned building was valued at $50,000 and is a total loss.

SCHOOL BUILDING, ROCHESTER, N. Y., SHOWING PART OF BRICK WALL STANDING.

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