“SECOND FIRES.”

“SECOND FIRES.”

“SECOND fires,” that is to say, fires that break out a second time in the same building after the first fire has been pronounced out by the fire department,are always looked upon with suspicion as being the result either of incendiarism or of carelessness on the part of the fire or patrol department. Of such fires there have been three conspcuous examples this year in this city. Two are recorded as happening several weeks ago—those on the premises of the William Wicke company, at 580 First avenue, and of the Ode & Gebereaux candy factory, at 419 West Broadway. The most recent took place on Saturday night, April 6, on the third floor of 88-85 White street—all were in Manhattan. The first fire in White street was put out with little dumage, and two fire patrolmen were left to watch the premises. At 1:45 a. m. on the next day, Battalion Chief Martin dropped in to inspect the premises, and, in spite of the assurances of a patrolman that he had just gone through the building thoroughly, the battalion chief concluded to take a look for himself. On opening the door into the fifth floor, a sheet of flame came out from a fire which must have been burning some time. In view of the other “second fires” this year, it seems as though this particular case called for a careful and exhaustive investigation. As matters stand, either a patrolman has been falsely accused, or the fire department was careless. Whichever way it was, an example should be made of whoever was in the wrong.

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