SHIPPING FIRE AT NEWPORT.

SHIPPING FIRE AT NEWPORT.

On March 27 at Newport, R. I, the Fall River line’s large sidewheel steamer Plymouth was burned to the water’s edge, the freight steamer City of Lowell was damaged (each was lying at the south dock), a long piershed, hoisting shears, paint shop and old railroad station were destroyed, and the paint was scorched off three other steamers, the Puritan, the Pricilla and the Naugatuck, by an early morning fire which burned for nearly three hours, and at one time threatened to destroy the entire repairing plant of the owners of the line, the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad company. The loss is estimated at $1,000,000. Late in the afternoon flames burst forth afresh from the hull of the Plymouth, and the boat was towed to a point between two (tiers, from which the employes of the line directed two streams of water. The ruins were still smouldering at night; but there was no danger of further damage. The five steamers were undergoing their customary spring overhauling, and the burned steamer was covered with the material needed. The flames on the Plymouth broke out in the saloon, and the crew had great difficulty in escaping. One perished. The entire city fire department was quickly on the scene; but before the first effective stream had been turned on the Plymouth, she was in flames from stem to stern, and the entire plant was threatened. The City of Lowell had also caught fire on her port side. She was hauled out into the harbor by two tugs. By that time there was no hope of saving the big shears or the shed, and the flames had spread to the paint shop and the old railroad station at the bead of the pier. Both were destroyed. T he two tugs steamed in again through the smoke and burning brands and towed the remaining steamers to safety. The Puritan and Priscilla were scorched; but. except from smoke, their interior fittings were not damaged. The Naugatuck was undamaged. T he steamer Plymouth was a sidewheel vessel of 2,280 tons, built at Chester, Pa., in 1890. Her hull was constructed of steel, and her interior fittings were nearly all of wood. Her length was 367 feet, width fifty feet, and depth of hold twenty-one feet. She was valued at nearly $1,000,000. and is almost a total loss. The loss on the wharf is estimated at $25,000, and on the shears. $10,000. The damage to the City of Lowell will be nearly $10,000. The paint shop and the old railroad station were of slight value.

CHIEF KIRWIN, NEWPORT, R. I.

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