SILVER JUBILEE AT MADISON WATERWORKS

SILVER JUBILEE AT MADISON WATERWORKS

With the rapid growth of Madison, the steady improvements of its streets, the demands upon the department are greater than the funds will allow. It can safely be estimated that over 90 per cent, of the population is furnished with city water. If the present number of actual water-takers is multiplied, including fourteen takers cut off by six and one-half, which is a safe figure as compared with the census of 1900 and 1905, the population today is 27,047. On October 11, 1907, the Madison, Wis., waterworks completed its twenty-fifth year of operations. It was built and is still owned by the city of Madison. The original cost of construction, including 11,645-5,260 miles of mains, eighty-four hydrants and sixty-four valves was $95,027.54, or $1.62 per ft.—a trifle more than $8,634.32 a mile. At the expiration of the twenty-fifth year the system has 49.4575-5280 miles of mains, 300 hydrants, 375 valves, 20.5253-5280 miles of service-connections, 4,147 water-takers and 4,069 water-meters. The total cost of construction, with a plant of four and one-half times as large as originally constructed, was $495,729.14, or $1.88½ a ft.—a trifle less than $9,914.58 a mile. This includes the amounts expended by the city for service-connections of $49,965.57 and $58,847.76 for water meters, both free to the water-takers (which are rarely furnished by cities or companies)—a total of $108,813.33 would reduce the cost of construction to $386,915.81, or $1.47 a ft., a trifle less than $7,738.31 a mile. The city’s population in t882 was 10,384; in 1890 it had increased to 13,246—an average gain in eight years of 357 per year. At the end of the first year there were 279 water-takers; at the end of the seventh, 1,355—a gain of 153 per year. The population in 1900, according to the census, was 19,164—an average gain of 592 per year. The water-takers had increased to 2,758—a gain of 140 per year. The population in 1905 had increased to 24,301—an average gain of 1,027 per year; the number of water-takers was 3,703—a gain of 189 per year. The gain in population during the past two years was 2,746)—1,373 per year; in water-takers 478— 239 per year, showing that the gain in watertakers kept pace with the gain in population. The past five years being the greatest in growth and development of the water department, having added during that period il’A miles of mains and 1,015 water-takers, it is proper to make a financial comparison with those years. The total cost of construction and extensions since September 30, 1902, was $120,897.80 (this includes a payment of $16,400 for the new 3,000,000 pump; $5,200 for a new addition to the pumping station; $7.405 57 for the propeller pumps, generators, motors and pole line; $2,514.75 for a storehouse and barn and $10,676.99 for meters and meter boxes, a total of $42,197.31) that brings the total amount expended for mains and service connections to $78,700.51. The operating and repair expense during same period was $93,036.59, a total of $213,934.35. The increase in receipts has also been great. Steps were taken for the new 1,000,000 gal. storage-reservoir and another artesian well. Specifications were prepared by Prof. !•’. E. Turneaurc, dean of the Engineering University of Wisconsin. The bottom walls and roof will be of concrete reinforced with steel rods. The inner measurement is 94 x 94 ft. square and has a depth of 16 ft. The well-casing is 16-in. outside diameter ameter casing begins at the depth of 100 ft. and is carried down 118 ft. and a 10-in. bore from there down to 750 ft. for the reservoir. Contract was awarded to George Nelson, of Madison, for $10,550; for the well, to W. H. Gray & Bro., of Chicago, Ill., for $3,900. During the past year there was considerable trouble with the motors: the pumping of sand and with the brass metal guide-boxes being too soft; also, the destruction of the steel shaft by the action of the water. The pump casing shows the same effect, and must soon be replaced. The motors were the first vertical built. They are now replaced with the latest improved and self-oiling device. The speed of the motor lias been reduced to prevent the pumping of sand as much as possible. A movable collar has been placed on the top of the guidebox which seems a good improvement, as it prevents the sand from settlin” between the shaft and guide-box. The bronze metal springs have been replaced with steel springs and later hard brass will probably be used in place of steel. During the year 1905-6, the propeller pump furnished a daily average of 155,189 gal., the average hours pumped per day being four. During the past year was pumped an average of 206,000 gal. a day, and an average pumpage of seven hours. As takers increase, so will this pumpage increase, and ere long the citv will be obliged to run both propeller pumps. In pursuance, a hydrant inspection has been appointed a hydrant inspector. All the hydrants are now numbered with a steel die. A blank record book is provided, in which one whole page is devoted to each hydrant. The book is paged and indexed, so that the number wanted can be turned to at once. The hydrants are inspected within ten days. With the inspection, flushing of mains is carried on mostly at the extreme east and west end. The inspector records the date of inspection in the book and such hydrants that need repairing are attended to as time permits. The fire and street departments report whenever they are obliged to use a hydrant its condition before and after usage. The past year was a great one for setting valves and hydrants and laying of pipe. Street-sprinkling valves were placed on all hydrants used by the streetsprinklers. They are also placed on hydrants for contractors when no other water is available. Placing this valve has minimised the repair expense, and the change is a great aid for the fire department in case of fire. During the past year additions have been made and the following is the total for 1906-7: 1.2582-5280 miles of mains, fourteen hydrants, twenty-two valves and 84 ft., of leadlined iron pipe. Grand total is 49.-46255280 miles of mains, 300 hydrants, 375 valves, 1840 ft. of lead-lined iron pipe; 170 ft. of x-in. extra strong lead pipe for a main supply lake end, southeast side of Bassett street off from Wilson street and 8,064 ft. of C. I. suction-main. During the coming season must be laid the 20-in. main of 1,056 ft. between the new and old storagereservoir; a 16-in. main between the new storagereservoir and the well at the corner of Mifflin and Livingston streets. Several 6-in. and 4-in. mains and additional hydrants must be-set. During the past year ending September 30, 1907, were laid 4,768 ft. of extra-strong lead pipe for service-connections. Adding to these other fortyfour services of 1,084 ft., brings the number of ft. of lead services laid to 20.5253-5280 miles. Two services of 48 ft., three of eighty-four. The three were also made of 67 ft. Thus far have been laid 18,831 ft. of lead services which are not in the summing up of the actual services in use. These 18,831 ft. mean 479 services to be connected with, when application for water is made. During the past year were issued 245 permits for actual water-takers—total issued since construction of 4,206. The actual water-takers number 4,147. Of these, 4,069 are metered and seventy-eight are under the schedule rate—these will be placed under the meter system as soon as they connect with the sewer-system; forty-five takers are shut off, some of whom are liable to be turned at any time and fourteen services discontinued to make room for larger buildings. Aside from the above were issued permits for free water to eighteen school buildings, ten churches, ten public buildings and four charitable institutions—total, forty-free takers. Besides, is furnished free water for the street sprinkling, automatic sewer-lift, sewer-flushing and lour fountains. The estimated amount of water used for these purposes is 255,000,000 gal.—340,909 cu. ft. at 5 cents a 100, amounting to $17,045.45. The water department ought to receive this amount front the taxes to assist in the necessary extensions. The estimated population supplied is 27,047; number of watertakers, 24,882; average gal. pumped per taker per day, 3St 1 average gal. pumped per capita per day, 53—total number of gal. passed through the meters, 197,622,258. Number of meters, 4,069; average gal. pumped per taker that passed through the meters per day, 22; average pounds of coal consumed per year per taker, 531. The mains are of cast iron; sizes, 4 to 16 in.; extended the past year 4-6-in. and 8-in., 7,862 ft.—total now in use, 49.4625-5280; number of hydrants added during the year, 14—total number of hydrants in use, 300; number of valves added during the year, 22—total number of valves in use, 375; lead-lined iron pipe added during the .year, 84 ft. —total lead-lined iron pipe in use, 1,840 ft.; number of blow-off valves, 3; range of pressure on mains in business centre of city, 53 to 65 lb. domestic; pressure at pumps, 86 to 90 lb.; fire pressure, 90 to 140 lb.; total ft. of suction pipe, 8,064. The services are of extra and double-extra strong lead; sizes, ⅝ to 2 in.; extended the past year, 5,852 ft.—total now in use, 110,155 ft. or 20.5253-52&) miles; number of services added during the year, 18b; number of improvement services added, 44—total number of services in use, including free takers, 4,187; number of improvement services laid, 8—total number of improvement services laid to be connected with, 479; number of meters added, 204; number of meters in use, 4,069; percentage of services metered, 98; cost of work to date, $495,729.14; present bonded debt, $20,000; rate of interest, 3% per cent.

Supt. John B. Heim, Madison, Wis.
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