Sioux City Fire Department Report.

Sioux City Fire Department Report.

In his annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911, Chief George M. Kellogg, of the Sioux City, Iowa, fire department, says there were 357 alarms, which is 99 more than has ever before been received in any one year. He says: “In answering the alarms the fire department traveled 1,490 miles and 11 blocks, worked 348 hours and 43 minutes, laid 105,650 feet of hose and stacked 2,390 feet of ladder. Of the above fires 179 were in wooden buildings, 62 in brick and stone buildings, 94 in outbuildings, cars, rubbish piles, burning grass, etc., and 22 were false alarms. The total manual force of the department at the close of the year consists of forty (40 ) men, distributed as follows: Chiefs, 1; assistant chiefs, 1; captains, 8; drivers, 11: engineers, 1; stokers, I; hosemen and laddermen. 15; electricians, 1; assistant electricians, 1. There are at the present time in the fire department service twenty-four head of horses, also the following apparatus: Four hose wagons, one combination hose and chemical wagon, three chemical engines, one city truck, one aerial truck with 75-foot extension, one first size steamer (Nott), one chief’s buggy. There is, in addition to the above apparatus, in reserve one Silsby two-horse hose cart, one old city truck, one combination Seagrave hose and chemical wagon and one hose wagon that belongs to members of the fire department and is loaded with hose and equipped with all necessary tools and appliances, which practically give us an extra company for emergency use by simply transferring company from chemical to hose wagon. There arc also five supply and exercise wagons, one electrician’s buggy and one electrician’s repair wagon. All apparatus in use at this time is in fairly good repair, with the exception of one of the exercise wagons. We have 11,900 feet of 2½inclt cotton hose (5,000 feet first class, 4,100 feet second class and 2,800 feet third class). Our loss for the year ending March 31, 1911, was $201,855.28. This is a greater loss than we had the two previous years and a greater loss than we liad hoped or expected to have up to the time of the Shenkberg and 1). Davidson fire in January, which entailed a loss of approximately $50,000, and then immediately after that came the Dougherty it Bryant fire, and our hopes for a report showing small losses this year were blasted. Rut even then, when we consider what might have happened to us in both of the above fires, I think that we are extremely fortunate that the loss was not greater. Our losses and insurance recovered for the year were as follows: l.oss on stock and fixtures $113,325.15. loss on buildings $88,580.13, total loss $201,855.28: insurance recovered on stock and fixtures $94,848.15, insurance recovered on buildings $77,202.13, total $172,050.?8. Net loss over amount of insurance collected, $29,805. In my last annual report 1 noted the fact that incendiarism had not been as prevalent as it had the previous year. I can make the same report this year, although there are still many suspicious fires. One year ago the sum of $40,500 was appropriated for salaries and expenses for this department for the Fiscal year ending March 31. 1911. W e have expended for salaries $32,328.40 and for expenses $8,435.83. This exceeds our appropriation but $264.23. This, I think, is a good showing when we consider the fact that we built a new combination wagon for Morningsidc and added one more man to our pay roll for Morningsidc company that we had not figured on, and paid about $1,000 for bills left over front last year. 1 beg to renew my recommendations that we either have our aerial truck rebuilt or buy a new one. Our old truck is out of date and slow to operate in its present condition, and from advices received from the factory 1 believe that it would be more satisfactory in the long run to buy a new truck. I would recommend that another fire engine he purchased. (If perfected to a high degree, probably an automobile fire engine.) Not only do we nee/1 it in case of a big fire or conflagration in the business district, but we need it on the north side, where the water pressure is weakest, and by stationing it at No. 4 fire house it could answer in either case, and if it was an automobile engine it could be run to Morningsidc also in a very few minutes, where the water pressure is not the best. I also think that another small city truck should he added to our equipment for the reason that our present truck has more territory to cover than it can successfully do, and much of our city is not covered by the truck company at all, we having to depend on small ladders carried on the chemical engine and on some of the hose wagons. I would recommend that another hose wagon be equipped with a turret nozzle. Also that more fire alarm boxes be added to our system, and if possible the system be extended to Morningsidc. Also that one more man be added to each company, and at least four, and if possible six, men be put on our aerial truck. I would also recommend that some kind of a gasoline or electric pump be purchased by the city to be used in pumping out flooded basements, and that under no circumstances should our fire engine ever be used for that purpose. I would also recommend that our central fire alarm station be moved from its present location on West Seventh street to a more central location in a more substantial building. where the danger of fire is not so great, as soon as it is convenient to do so.”

COMPLETE ENVELOPMENT OF THE OHIO VALLEY FURNITURE FACTORY AT GALLIPOLIS.

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