Six-Foot Gate Valve for Cleveland, O., Water-Works.

Six-Foot Gate Valve for Cleveland, O., Water-Works.

This gate is used on a branch aqueduct, connecting the old five-foot tunnel, built in 1876, with the new seven-foot tunnel completed in 1890. The gate was designed by Mr. John Whitelaw, superintendent and engineer of water-works. As will be seen by the drawing, it has three wedge-shaped sliding gates, each independent of the other, and are operated vertically by means of screws and hand wheels. The body of the gate is ol cast iron, 2 inches thick, and has a tensile strength of over 12,000 pounds per square inch, and has been tested to 200 pounds hydrostatic pressure. The centre slide is 12 inches wide, and those on the sides are 2 feet to inches wide at the centre line. The slides and their seats have a brass lacing 2 inches wide and % inch thick. The rods operating the slides are of steel, 2 5-16 inches in diameter, and connected to slides with steel keys, and to upper end by ITFPught iron couplings and steel keys. The rods arc encased above the body of the valve in a cast iron pipe 4^ inches inner diameter and ⅝ inch thick. This pipe is closed on lop with a flanged cap bolted to pipe. Hand wheels are 2 feet in diameter, with brass nut inside. The gate complete weighs about 24,400 pounds. Two of them were built for the Cleveland Water-Works by Thomas Manning, Jr., & Co., of Cleveland, O.

A NEW Danger.—A new danger appears to threaten the consumers of natural gas. A few days ago the automatic regulator at the main distributing station in Detroit got out of order, and shut off the supply from the street pipes. Although the accident occurred at 2 o’clock in the morning, lights were burning in many houses and gas fires in many more and, of course, the light was extinguished when the supply stopped, and when it was restored the unlighted gas poured out of the burners into the rooms. A large part of the meters are furnished with safety valves,, which close on a failure of the supply and remain closed until reset by the inspectors, but the gas escaped in many houses, while the occupants were asleep. The manager of the gasworks showed admirable energy in the emergency. The fire department was called up, ready for instant service, while all the men that could be spared were sent in different directions through the city to warn housholders and look for signs of danger, and notice was sent to the police officials, who set the patrol-men at work waking the citizens, which they did so successfully that they are said to have aroused half the town. Thanks to these precautions, only two serious accidents took place, both of them from explosions caused by striking matches in places filled with an accumulation of gas.

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