Small Fire Loss in Indianapolis

Small Fire Loss in Indianapolis

The 1922 official report of the fire losses for the city of Indianapolis, Ind., show a much larger number of alarms and a lower loss figure. The total loss on buildings was $419,980 and on contents $458,235. The number of alarms for the year were 4,042. Fires in dwellings were 2,570 with a loss of $278,160. There were 1,581 fires in dwellings caused by sparks falling on wooden shingle roofs. Fifteen second alarm and three third alarms were answered by the department for the year, 275 false alarms being received. The largest fire of the year was that of the Pearson Piano Company, on the night of April 23. This loss was $100,556. Although the number of alarms reached a much greater number in a total compared with other years, Chief John J. O’Brien and other city officials point with pride to the low total loss for the year.

Small Fire Loss in Indianapolis

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Small Fire Loss in Indianapolis

In referring to the fact that Indianapolis does not appear on the list of sixty-six cities in the United States where the per capita fire loss amounted to $5 or more in 1921, compiled by the committee on statistics and origin of fires of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, Frank C. Jordan, chairman of the fire prevention committee of the chamber of commerce of that city and secretary of the Indianapolis Water Company said: “In recent years Indianapolis usually has been included in this list, but I am glad to say that our 1921 loss was considerably below the average throughout the United States and we were spared the unpleasant publicity of being included. Our fire loss since January 1 of this year indicates that our 1922 per capita loss will be somewhere around $3, a record of which we can feel proud.

“Indianapolis may well take heart at the reduction made thus far in total fire losses, but a per capita loss of $3 is too high. It means that for every resident of Indianapolis properly valued at $3 is destroyed by fire in the course of the year. Care and adherence to the common rules of fire prevention will bring the per capita loss still lower. Accurate figures for last year are not complete, but the fire underwriters place the Nation’s loss at close to $500,000,000 or nearly a $5 per capita loss for the whole United States.”

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Small Fire Loss in Indianapolis

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