Smoke Helmets Used in Fire at Toledo

Smoke Helmets Used in Fire at Toledo

Fire was discovered recently at 7:26 a. m., in a twostory brick structure, 66 x 132, in the heart of the business district of Toledo, Ohio. The fire started in the basement from cause unknown, and when the department arrived, under command of the chief, L. H. Elling, the basement was so filled with smoke that the men could not get at the fire, added to which hindrance an explosion of gasoline followed quickly. Two smoke helmets and eight cellar pipes were fortunately included in the equipment and gave valuable service. Three steamers, ten combination hose and chemical trucks, and four ladder trucks were employed by the department, which comprised about 72 men. Fifteen hydrants, 6-inch, 3and 4-way, were available for use, and some being in the high pressure zone, had a 200-pound pressure, while the low pressure was 60 pounds. Fifteen hydrant streams were thrown at the high pressure, and three low pressure, with two engine streams, making a total of 20 streams at a time, nozzles varying from 1⅛ to 1¼ inches. The H. P. water mains were 10-inch and 12-inch, while the L. P. were 6-inch, 12-inch and 24-inch. Of cotton rubber-lined hose, 1.500 feet of 3-inch and 7,300 feet of 2 1/2-inch were laid. The fire was stopped in the place of origin after burning 3 1/3 hours. The property was valued at $125,000, and was damaged to the estimated extent of $15,000. It was occupied with a furnace and machine shop, drug store, pawn shop, cigar store and bowling alley, having a combined valuation of about $50,000, on which the loss was estimated at $28,000. The illustration gives a very good idea of the dense smoke that hampered the firemen and necessitated the use of the smoke helmets.

Smoky Fire in Toledo Bowling Alley Building
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