SNOW-BALLING A FIRE OUT.

SNOW-BALLING A FIRE OUT.

One morning in January, 1826, says a Montreal paper, after a heavy fall of damp snow the day before, a fire broke out in a large wooden warehouse, in which were stored six hundred barrels of pork and several hundred barrels of flour. It evidently caught near the top, for a in few minutes the roof of the building, which was of great length, was almost wreathed in smoke and flames, while the walls remained intact. A large crowd of men and boys rapidly collected, but the Engine for some reason not arriving, and the river, the only source of water supply, being covered with thick ice, and above all the crowd being without a lender and utterly confused, nothing of importance was done to stop the fire, and the building seemed doomed to complete destruction. Just as the idea had settled into a conviction in the minds of those present, Henry Corse came rushing over to the scene from his factory, shouting at the top of his voice, “ What are you thinking of, men ? Why don’t you snow-ball that fire out?” and, suiting the action to the word, he caught up a handful of the damp snow and flung it upward. The crowd caught the idea on the instant, all they wanted was a leader, and making a solid rush forward, they caught up the snow at their feet and a moment later half a theusmd snow-balls were mounting fireward and falling with a hiss upon the blazing timbers. Never was just such a sight seen before ; the immense crowd surrounded and stormed the fire-fiend with a will, chtering and shouting in their excitement; the scow missilr s fl w upward thicker than hail falls in December. The great snow-ball fight of Napoleon and his fellows at Brienne school was nothing in comparison to it. Almost after the first half-dozen volleys the fire seemed to pause as if astonished at the novel mode of attack ; before it could recover, another and another storm ot balls fell upon it, until beaten and battered down nt one point and flaming cut at aether, assailed wi lr a moving wall of icy missiles wherever it burst out’with renewed violence, in an hour’s time it was completely baffled and under control, nnd in another hour entirely subdued. The only loss to the building was its roof, badly burned, while the stores of pork and flour inside were comparatively undamaged. The crowd dispersed in the highest good spin’s, and the affair was talked of and laughed over for many a day afterward.

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