SOFTENING WATER FOR LOCOMOTIVES.

SOFTENING WATER FOR LOCOMOTIVES.

The Pittsburgh, Pa., Post describes a process of softening water especially for use in locomotives as follows:

Plans have been prepared by the Pittsburgh Filter Manufacturing company for a continuous flow watersoftening plant, with especial reference to railroad needs, embodying distinctly radical departures from hitherto accepted methods, as well as including features that will readily appeal to those familiar with the underlying principles governing the designing and operation of water-softening plants. Aside from the various types of construction, there are two essentially different kinds of water-softening plants— continuous and intermittent. Each kind has its good points, and the engineering officials of the various railroads are not a unit regarding the merits of the two kinds. Other things being equal, the continuous flow type meets with the most favor. There seems to be little doubt, however, but that the intermittent type is the better, because more time is allowed for precipitation. With the style of plant just designed some novel features are incorporated. In a general way the process is this: Raw water from the city mains or from any source is admitted through a water motor, feeding through a six-inch pipe, to the precipitation tank, thirty feet high. Connected with the water motor are two rakes, one operating in a lime reservoir, the other, in a soda receptacle. As the water enters the precipitation tank, but before being discharged into it, the fluid is carried through a twelve-inch pipe, in which are placed a given number of baffle plates. Meanwhile the motor has forced the requisite amount of lime water or scda water into the twelve-inch pipe, where. the aid of the baffle plates, the water and the purifying agents are thoroughly mixed. After the water is thoroughly mixed, it enters the open space in the precipitation tank, passes out through the fillers, and enters the roadside tub. Experts who have examined the new design unhesitatingly say that it far surpasses the older types of continuous flow plants. Under average conditions a plant, with a daily capacity of 300,000 gallons, would cost approximately $5,000.

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