SOME MASSACHUSETTS FIRE NOTES.

SOME MASSACHUSETTS FIRE NOTES.

[Specially written for FIRE AND WATER].

Groveland considers $250 enough to spend on its fire department this year, It will chance the losses from forest fires.— Chief Packard has been reelected chief of the Attleboro fire department for the eighth tine. He became a ladder “man” when a boy of seventeen years of age. He had twenty-two alarms of fire last year.—Beverly has reelected Chief Good hue. — Hudson needs horses to haul its engine and its truck. A fire at a tannery had recently twenty minutes headway in consequence of the impossibility of immediately horsing the apparatus, and a dwelling house on another late occasion was burned to the ground because the steamer could not attend to the call. The selectmen, if they do buy horses, will utilize them in working on the highways within a few minutes call during the day, forgetting that it is the first few seconds that elapse before a call is turned in that count. At night the horses will be kept at the central station, with a permanent man in attendance.—The police recently arrested nine men of the Hancock hand engine company at Brockton for playing cards in their engine house on Sunday! They were fined $5 and $10 apiece. The company will probably be disbanded and Chief Marston will have the the old prize-winning engine (formerly of Charlestown) sold and a first-class chemical engine installed in its place.—The death is announced of former Chief Horne, of the Watertown fire department. Mr. Horne died at Dedham and was buried at Watertown.—The Rudge Manual Training School for boys at Cambridge, Mass., gives its pupils fire drill with a regular apparatus. Hose carriages and ladders are on hand in the building and on an alarm of fire the boys man these, attach the hose to the hydrants, and have a stream playing in no time The water pressure is such as not to call for engines.—The Boston Firemen’s Relief fund had $11,713.55 added to its treasury—the net proceeds of the firemen’s ball recently held in Mechanics’ hall.—Substitute Ladderman Bailey, of ladder No. 15, has been recommended by Fire Commissioner Russell,of Boston, to the Massachusetts Humane Association for brave rescue of human life at the risk of his own during a recent fire in Boston.—La France, engine No. 26 (“ big Injun”) has been to 400 fires without having needed any repairs.— Some of the outside suburban companies of Boston do not see why they should be obliged to hitch up “ at every alarm from everywhere.”—Commissioner Russell defends the removal of the fire alarm registers from the engine house. They were too inacurate for any reliance to be placed upon them. He recommends stationing a hook and ladder truck and a chemical engine at Grove Hall. The city purchased the land for that purpose some years ago.—Chief Ilosmer still holds the fort at Lowell—he will probably continue to hold it.—The Chicopee permanent firemen are moving in the direction of getting a day off in their turn.—h ire Commissioner Crombie, of Lawrence, has publicly and officially expressed his high appreciation of Chief Beal and the fire department of the city.—William H. Whitwell has been elected chief of the fire department of Onset, with David Phillips and Charles L.Bates as his assistants.—Holyoke asksforan appropriation of $59,000 for its fire department for the current year. Its expenses in 1896 were$62,000.

SOME MASSACHUSETTS FIRE NOTES.

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SOME MASSACHUSETTS FIRE NOTES.

[Specially written for FIRS AND WATKR.]

Two hundred and fifty dollars a year is all that Hndson has with which to keep up its truck company.—The Blake hose company, of Nelson, is to have a new fire station built at a cost of $12,000.—Spencer is crying out for better hose and more of it.—The question at Lowell is whether E. D. Kerwin, the mayor’s nominee, or Chief Hosmer is in command of the fire department there. The matter goes into court unless the aldermen and city council can agree on a man acceptable to the mayor. Public opinion is overwhelmingly in favor of Chief Hosmer.—The insurance companiesat NewBedford have petitioned the mayor not to interfere with present management of the fire department. They, at all events, are quite content to allow Chief Macy and his assistants to have complete control.—Somerville will spend $9,000 in remodeling its fire stations.—Melrose will appropriate $15,000 for a new fire station in the Wyoming district.—The selectmen of Winchester have voted to request the resignation of Chief Morgan, of the local fire department.—Arlington has appropriated $7,500 for its fire department; Watertown, $6,250; Randolph, $3,200; Braintree, $2,730; Millbury, $2,500; Manchester, $1,675; and Millis, $500. — Fitchburg will build a $5,679 fire house.

The little town of Nasso, in Sweden, has a female department, 150 strong, in its fire brigade. The water supply of the village consists simply of four great tubs, and it is the duty of the women ” firemen ” to keep these full in case of fire. They stand in two continuous lines from the tubs to the lake, about three streets away, one line passing the full buckets and the other sending them back.