SOME MASSACHUSETTS WATER NOTES

SOME MASSACHUSETTS WATER NOTES

[From an Occasional Correspondent.]

Chief Engineer Jackson, of Boston, in hisannual report says that from the filtering-beds for Began brook,in use for the greater portion of the past year,273,698,000 gallons have been pumped. The Sudbury river aqueduct was in use 335.9 days,and delivered 12,908,500 gallons into Chestnut Hill rescrvoir,896,800,000 gallons into Lake Cochituate. The Cochituate aqueduct was used 361 days, and delivered 5,654,765,700 gallons. The daily average consumption for the year was as follows: Sudbury and Cochituate works, 50,801, too gallons; Mystic works, 9,467,000 gallons—total for the combined supplies, 60,268, too gallons—being an increase of 3,426,000 gallons, or 6 per cent., from that of the previous year. This gave a daily average consumption per inhabitant of 104.3 gallons of Cochituate and Sudbury, and 83.3 gallons of Mystic. Mr. Jackson would raise the storage capacity to 200,000,000 gallons. In 1879 high-service work was established, with a capacity of 5.000,000 gallons daily, with no storage. In 1874 a reservoir was built on Parker Hill, with a capacity of 7,200.000 gallons, the average daily consumption being at that time 1,200,000 gallons. Late in 1885 the consumption of water from the high service had reached 2,500,000 gallons daily, and the demand for its extension was pressing, and a new pumping station, having a capacity of 16,000,000 gallons daily, was constructed at Chestnut Hill reservoir.and an additional reservoir it Fisher Hill, having a capacity of 15,400,000 gallons, making, with the Parker Hill reservoir, a total storage capacity of 22,600,000 gallons. In 1884 the consumption had reached over 11,000,000 gallons daily,and a new pump was added to theChestnut Hill plant, having a opacity of 20,000,000 gallons daily. The consumption for high service for the year 1895 averaged 10,384,600 gallons daily, the maximum being 11,719,300 gallons.—Evidence is being accumulated for the defence of the dry of Boston’s water system, which is to be taken by the Metropolitan water board. Engineer Allen has been engaged as an expert, so that, when the Metropolitan water board takes the next instalment, everythin; will be ready for the fight. The State board has until 1898 to take the water system of Boston, and they intend to pay the city only $6,000,000 for the system which cost it $26,000,000. Boston is determined to receive its just share for giving up its property to benefit neighboring towns.—The new dam for Worcester at Kent’s ponj will cost $58,000. and $10,000 more has been appropriated for cleaning out the bed of the pond.—At Holyoke, every piece of stone that is to form part of the new dam is cut to a pattern, and for the odd shapes and sizes special plans were made.—There are to be about 1,200 pieces in the face of the work, and about 400 have been received, so that there will be no delay when the work really starts.—Gorham has now a pumping station situated about a mile below the village, containing two pumps, one with a capacity of 1,000.000 gallons per twenty-four hours and an emergency pump with 500,000 gallons capacity, which take the water from the Sebago main through an 8-inch main to a standpipe on Dolley’s Hill which has a capacity of $359,856 gallons. Mr. Charles F. Hutchinson is the engineer and superintendent of the company. The fire pressure is ample.—At Springfield the supply of water Is as Short as that of algte is long.—An agitation is afoot at Haverhill to remove from the borders of Round pond some filthy stables and pig styes, which are a constant menace to the purity of the water supply.—The Middlesex manufacturing Company has brought suit against the city of Howell, alleging that the water of Meadow brook has been diverted from feeding into the Concord river. The Howell people will fight the company in defence of their driven wells.—Quincy has appropriated $10,000 to be used in extending water mains.

CHIEF THOMAS CASEY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS

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