SOME OLD WORLD FIRE NOTES.

SOME OLD WORLD FIRE NOTES.

A recent fire at the University riding school, Heidelberg, Germany, caused the death of four persons and the loss of twenty-seven horses.—An incendiary fire set during a ball at Alosno, Spain caused the death of six persons and serious injuries to many others.—A recent destructive fire at Bombay, East Indies, was caused by a defective electric light wire.— The corporation of the town of Nottingham, Eng., have adopted the system of underground tanks for the supply of water for the steam fire engines. A test tank 4 feet deep. 6 feet long, and 4 feet across was tried and furnished water enough to keep two steamers running. One man’s services sufficed to regulate the supply from the mains to The firemen of Eastleigh, Eng., are to he insured against accidents at fires at a cost of $15 per annum for twelve men. The firemen of Gravesend are similarly insured, as well as elsewhere — The fire brigade of Constantinople, under Count Szechenyi Pacha, were called to 62 fires in the Turkish capital during 1895.—In Norfolk, ling., the school master’s ferule does not seem to be of much avail—if. at least, we may judge from the following estimate recently received at the head office of the Norwich Union Insurance Society: “F.stament for Repares from Damage by fier at Mr. I–’s farm House flues Defected Rufe jice ciils and larth Burnt Slate Damage by F-xtingains the fier Slates Require Re Plasen to Thlrley Repare flues ruf Slate and tiles on Wish House For the Sum of 50s. od.”—The fire loss of Paris during 1895 was very heavy. It amounted to $2,560,000 for.1,370 fires, as against $1,083,673 for 1,104 in 1894. In 1881 the loss of 1895 was exceeded, the number of fires being 945 with a loss of $3,000,000. The abnormal loss of 1895 resulting chiefly from one fire—at Godillet on July t, caused the French governchief of the Paris fire ment to send Col. Varigault, chief of the Paris fire brigade, with two other officers, to inspect the American fire departments last fail. To extinguish the Godillet blaze were required 49 lines of hose, the firemen being at work for fourteen hours continuously. The Paris brigade has now six bicycles in service. In its ranks are 51 officers and 1,700 men. Its maintenance last yearcost$525,447The department is apparently somewhat hampered by red tape. The firemen were recently sent to put a fire in some small buildings in the avenue de Neuilly, just outside the Porte Maillot, one of the gates of the city. The firemen’sinstructions would not permit them to go outside the fortifications without special permit from the prefect of police. They had consequently to remain inactive, and watch the fire for about twenty-five minutes, while a message was sent to the prefect, by whom the necessary permission was granted. By the time the brigade were allowed to get to work, the buildings were already gutted,and but little good could he done.— The income of the London Salvage corps last year amounted to $151,750. The corps attended altogether 3,635 fires as against 3,060 in 1894. Capt. Fox, its new chief officer, is recruiting the ranks, as far as possible, from the petty officers of the navy, with first class certificates.— Capt. Peterson, chief of the Glasgow, Scotland, fire brigade, is proud of his men. He says of them: “I cannot say enough in praise of their work. They are the most self-sacrificing set of men I know. Not one of them will shirk the most dangerous piece of work; in ail my experience I never knew a case of ‘funking’. In fact, the difficulty is not to get them into danger, but to keep them out of it; and I have sometimes to use pretty strong language to get them out of dangerous positions’”—Fireman Tiplady, of the Newcastle-on-l’yne fire brigade, who dieil recently from the effects of injuries received by falling from a fire-escape on its way to I fire In that city, was at one time in the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, hor saving several lives at fires in London he received the Brigade silver medal. One of his bravest deeds was the saving of eleven lives when the excursion steamer Princess Alice sank in the Thames, for which he was decorated with the Alliert gold medat. Tiplady, as a sprinter, carried off over40prizes. He had been in the Newcastle brigade for nearly sixteen years and was thirty-eight years of age at the time of his death. His body was buried with “brigade honors” in a vault specially set apart for firemen.—There have been 269 fires in Birmingham during the last sixteen years caused by lamp accidents, through which 41 persons were injured and 16 had died.— The Copenhagen fire brigade attended 373 fires in 1895, and was besides called out to 59 false alarms. Even the Danish children apparently cause fires through playing with matches, 21 being due to that cause.—Superintendent Mallinson, of the Skipton, Yorkshire fire brigade, on being chided for the antiquity of the manual engine belonging to the town—one which “must have been made when Adam was a l)oy,” retorted that Skipton possessed a manual engine when many larger towns had no engine at all—not even (ire buckets. He is ready to back his old manual for business against many of the more modern make.—At Calcutta, Cast Indies, the fire brigade was powerless to stop a recent disastrous conflagration, owing to lack of water.—The Condon Tit-Hits offers a silver medal for exceptional bravery displayed by firemen or policemen.— For the protection of Westminster hall, London, against fire, there are nearly too hydrants placed in the building, with a standpipe and hose close by each. Kvery policeman employed in the precincts has to go through a bi-weekly course of fire drill, which is superintended by Chief Inspector Horsley.—The official participation of some English volunteer firemen in uniform in some Whitsun-Day fetes at Kouen in France has given rise to some angry comments in some so-called religious papers in England, Scotland, and Ireland, as well as in the pulpits of the Nonconformists.

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