SOME RECENT FIRES THAT CAUSED BIG LOSS

SOME RECENT FIRES THAT CAUSED BIG LOSS

From Special Reports to “Fire and Water Engineering.”

Morocco Plant at Wilmington

Fire which started from an unknown cause at 2.40 p. m., Sunday, Feb. 15, in the morocco plant of Barr & Dougherty, in East Fifth street, Wilmington, Del., completely destroyed the plant, together with all the machinery and stock, causing a loss that will amount to more than $100,000. Working under great handicaps, the firemen succeeded in confining the flames to the morocco plant. Frame houses were built flush against the walls of the destroyed building. The flames broke out in the salesroom where there was nothing that could cause a fire. Fed by the oil and grease and fanned by a strong wind which had a clear sweep through the whole factory, the flames spread rapidly through the big fivestory brick building. The weather was severe and several firemen had to be chopped from ladders and nozzles. It was so cold that firemen had to work in relays. Less than an hour after the fire was discovered it had spread through the building from one end to the other, and the whole place was a mass of flames.

TWO VIEWS OF MOROCCO PLANT AT WILMINGTON, DEL., DURING FIRE.REAR VIEW OF MOROCCO PLANT, WILMINGTON, DEL., AFTER FIRE.

The building destroyed was 60 x 125, five stories high, constructed of brick 35 years ago and had no fire equipments. The fire started in the stock room and was caused by spontaneous combusion. It was sweeping through the entire building when Chief E. M. Ainscon and the fire department arrived. There were eight steam fire engines, three motor pumping engines, three motor hose wagons, three horse-drawn combination wagons, three horsedrawn hose wagons and two ladder trucks in service. The engines had sufficient water from an 80-pound pressure gravity system through a sixteen-inch main and eleven 4-inch single hydrants located 250 feet apart. There were seventeen 1 1/4 and 1 1/2-inch streams, fifteen being engine streams, on the fire and 52,000 feet of hose was used. Joseph Cash, a member of Engine 2, contracted a cold at the fire which developed into pneumonia, resulting in his death.

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