Springfield Supply Getting Short.

Springfield Supply Getting Short.

The water supply of Springfield, is reported to be getting short. A local paper commenting editorially on the subject says that the city with its excellent water supply few people give any heed to the danger of a water famine. It is not believed that we are menaced by any such dan ger. Yet there is no question but that thousands of gallons are wasted daily. This waste, especially great during the summer months when the wells are low, does make the furnishing of water a great task. Various expedients have been adopted to insure a supply, in summer as in winter, but if more care were observed by all consumers of water the supply would be purer, since natural filtration into the wells would serve and the method adopted here to aid nature, namely that of causing the creek to overflow and permitting the water to seep through the intervening strata to the wells, would not be necessary. During the year 1910 the average daily consumption of water, for each individual in the city, amounted to 113 gallons. This is in itself evidence of great waste. The continuation of this waste is bound, in time, to result in great expense since as the city grows the water supply must be enlarged, in speaking of this in his last annual report. Superintendent George Cotter said: “The department, as far as its physical condition, is good; outside of the fact that the increased consumption of water is growing so much that we are approaching the period when it will be necessary to reduce the consumption, either by installing a complete meter system, or to provide a 15,000,000-gallon pump to take care of the increased consumption. During the year we pumped 19.2 per cent, more water than we did during 1909. The actual figures were 1,910,771.527 gallons in 1910, and 1,512.555,376 gallons in 1909. This as an increase of 368,116,151, or 19.2 per cent. This is a daily average for the year of 5,234,716 gallons, or a per capita daily consumption of 113 gallons.

No posts to display