Springfield Water Good.

Springfield Water Good.

Giving it as their belief that the water being furnished the citizens of Springfield. Mo., is pure and wholesome by reason of its passing through the filtration plant, the report of the water committee of the council and of the city board of health was submitted to the city council at a recent meeting. The report contained a recommendation that the water furnished by the local company be used for drinking purposes in preference to cistern, well or unfiltered spring water. The report was signed by Mayor Robert E. Lee and Dan C. Crane and Charles McKenna of the water committee and by Dr. G. B. Lemmon, Dr. C. B. Elkins and Dr. Edgar F. James of the board of health.

The report is as follows: “We. your committee to whom was referred the communication of the mayor relative to the condition of the water that is being furnished this city by the Springfield Water Company, beg leave to report as follows: “Professor Hale, a chemist in whom we have the utmost confidence, explained to us how they are making daily tests of the water before and after passing through the filtration plant, and also of the water taken from the pipes here in the city, and we were convinced beyond any doubt of the purity of our water and have no hesitation in recommending its use. We find the Springfield Water Company obtains the water furnished the city from the following sources: The Fulbright spring, which is situated at the pumping station and is fed from the Valley Water Mills reservoir. From an intake pipe in the north fork of the Little Sac, some distance above the junction of the north and south forks of the Little Sac. This stream is supplied from a watershed several miles north and northeast of the city. From an intake pipe in the Little Sac at the Ritter Springs pumping station. This water comes from the watershed of the north fork of the Sac and also of the south fork, which drains the territory north of the city. The north city sewer empties into the bed of this stream just north of Doling park. We found this stream dry above the filter plant, which is about two miles above the intake. From the Ritter spring. The water from the Ritter spring flows into a basin, into which is also emptied the water from the North Sac. From this basin the water is pumped into the basin at the Fulbright spring, from which place it is sent through the filter. In regard to the city sewer which empties into the bed of the south fork of the Sac we found that the sewage had been evaporated and absorbed into the ground and did not reach the water supply and that there is no indication of any sewage for a distance of two miles above the intake. We believe that the water from these various sources, after passing through the filter plant, is pure and wholesome, and we recommend its use in preference to cistern, well or unfiltered spring water.”

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