Sprinkler Order Upheld

Sprinkler Order Upheld

hire Commissioner Johnson has obtained a decision from Justices Moss, O’Keefe and Zeller in the Court of Special Sessions sustaining his order for the installation of automatic sprinklers in all buildings, fireproof or otherwise, devoted to manufacturing purposes. The decision was on a test ease brought by Corporation Counsel Watson against Charles Kaye, owner of the twelve-story building, 30-34 West Twenty-sixth street, who was chosen by other building owners to defy the order of Commissioner Johnson, issued April 4, 1912. Kaye was placed on trial in the Court of Special Sessions two months ago. Through his attorney, Carlisle Norwood, Kaye contended that the order of Commissioner Johnson was unreasonable, inasmuch as his building had been constructed in compliance with the specifications of the building and fire codes. It was shown by Commissioner Johnson that in the event of a fire the lives of employes in tile building might be endangered because of inflammable material used by the tenants, who arc white goods manufacturers. The three justices found Kaye guilty of a misdemeanor. Justice Moss imposed a fine of $25 on Kaye, remarking that if it had not been for the recommendation of Assistant Corporation Counsel MacNulty be would have imposed a much heavier fine. Mr. Norwood will appeal.

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Sprinkler Order Upheld

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Sprinkler Order Upheld

Fire Commissioner Johnson has obtained a decision from Justices Moss, O’Keefe and Zeller in the Court of Special Sessions, sustaining his order for the installation of automatic sprinklers in all buildings, fireproof or otherwise, devoted to manufacturing purposes. The decision was on a test case brought by Corporation Counsel Watson against Charles Kaye, owner of the 12-story building, Nos. 30-34 West 26th street, who was chosen by other building owners to defy the order of Commissioner Johnson, issued April 4, 1912. Kaye was placed on trial in the Court of Special Sessions two months ago. Through his attorney, Kaye contended that the order of Commissioner Johnson was unreasonable, inasmuch as his building had been constructed in compliance with the specifications of the building and fire codes. It was shown by Commissioner Johnson that in the event of a fire the lives of employes in the building might be endangered because of inflammable material used by the tenants. who are white goods manufacturers. The three justices found Kaye guilty of a misdemeanor. Justice Moss imposed a fine of $25 on Kaye, remarking that if it had not been for the recommendation of Assistant Corporation Counsel MacNulty he would have imposed a much heavier fine. Defendant’s counsel gave notice of an appeal.