St. Louis Water Works Improvements

St. Louis Water Works Improvements

With a view to enlarging the capacity of the water works plant at the Chain of Rocks, hills have been introduced in the municipal assembly at St. Louis, Mo., providing for an appropriation of $1.200,000 It is proposed to build a clarification system similar to that in New Orleans, partial sedimentation by means of settling basins, followed by filtration. The proposed improvements include the erection of a new intake tower, the revetment of the Illinois bank of the river opposite the Chain of Rocks and the installation of mechanical filters. The cost of the improvements will amount to about $2,000,000, but only $1,200,000 is asked for at this time. The Board of Public Improvements has approved the plans for the new intake tower, which will be erected 600 feet east and 150 feet north of the present tower. The cost of the superstructure is $40,000, and the part below the water, including the tunnel, will cost approximately $410,000, making the total cost of the tower and tunnel $450,000. The new tower will rise out of the river to a height of ninety feet. The style of the architecture of Imperial Rome has been adapted to the superstructure. The tower is to be so built it will stand for centuries. The lower portion is to he of concrete, faced with granite, and the upper part of tooled Bedford limestone, with heavy rustication around the windows and doors.

NEW INTAKE TOWER AT CHAIN OF ROCKS, ST. LOUIS WATER WORKS, TO COST $450,000.

The tower will stand on bed rock five or six feet below the level of the foundation of the present tower. The interior of the tower will contain pumps and engines, which control the water taken in the tunnel. Extra men employed in the winter to aid in the fight against ice floes will be housed on the second floor of the tower. The living quarters for the tower keeper will be on the third floor. The tower will be supplied with every known device for the handling of ice in the winter and the taking in of water when the river is extremely low. The architects are Roth & Study.

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