STATE RESERVOIR FOR NEW JERSEY.

STATE RESERVOIR FOR NEW JERSEY.

The State potable water commission, having inspected the waterworks of northern New Jersey, has determined, it is said, on the nature of the schemes it will recommend to the governor with respect to the conservation of the water supplies of that end of the State. The plan represented to be looked upon with most favor is the same as that proposed by the flood commission, and will not only protect the potable waters, but, also, provide against floods in the territory covered in the report. The flood commission proposed to build a dam across the Pompton river at Mountain View, and a reservoir, covering an acreage of eighteen square miles, constructed over the Pompton plains. Another reservoir site under consideration is that of the “Great Piece,” over the Pine Brook flats, as suggested by the Geological Survey. The acreage of this proposed lake is fifty square miles, reaching from Little Falls almost to Chatham. Its maximum depth, however, would be but 25 ft., while the Pompton lake would measure as deep as 55 ft., with the result that the capacity of the two reservoirs as estimated by Chief Engineer Sherrerd, of Newark, would be the same. The latter site, was, therefore, considered by the potable water commissioners as the more practicable of the two from an economical point of view. The practicability of constructing a series of reservoirs in the Ramapo valley was also inquired into; but the commissioners looked with little favor upon this scheme. The commission also directed much of its attention to the Pompton feeder of the Morris canal, with a view to ascertaining whether the canal management is diverting any of its water supply to the benefit of the East Jersey Water company. The canal has a charter right to draw upon both Greenwood lake and lake Hopatcong, and it would be an easy matter, so the commissioners say, to draw upon these sources for more water than is needed and turn the surplus into the Pompton river and thence to the East Jersey’s pumping station at Little Falls. The canal viaduct, which crosses the river just above the latter place, was noticed by the commissioners to be leaking, and they, therefore, intended to investigate as to whether or not the waters are being purposely diverted. The commissioners have traveled nearly 300 miles in their exploration of the watershed of the Passaic the Pequannock and the Ramapo valleys. They have traced the several water supplies to their source, and carefully examined the topography of the country. They particularly investigated the resources of the East Jersey Water company, at Little Falls, and of the Hackensack Water company at New Milford. At the latter place the company’s pumping station and filterbeds were carefully inspected, while its reservoir at Hillsdale Manor was also visited. The plant of the East Jersey company had been inspected on a previous occasion. The commission will acquaint itself thoroughly with the resources of these two companies—the capacity of their reservoir and that of their pumps—as well as learn how much water they furnish their consumers, in order that the commission may have a basis for determining what rate the companies will have to pay the State for future drainage upon the water sources in excess of their present output. They will be asked to furnish the com mission with all the necessary data, which will be compared with Chief Engineer Sherrerd’s report upon Ivis personal investigations. The companies will also be required to furnish the commission with reports of their daily output, according to their meters. Each of the two water companies claims now to be pumping about 20.000,000 gals, of water a day. Their capacity is twice that amount.

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