STATE WATER STORAGE.

STATE WATER STORAGE.

The statement made that State Comissioner J. P. Lewis, who advocates the State storage of water, derives any personal profit from the building by the State of the Beaver river reservoir, is implicitly and explicitly denied by himself, as follows: “As to the statement that I profited from the construction of the reservoir, it is absurd to anybody who knows the true conditions. I made it perfectly plain at the com mittee hearing that the building of the new cement dam was a positive detriment to us in floating our timber down the river. Formerly the timber was put into the stream at that point and floated away; but, under present conditions, it has to be put in above the dam and then run through a sluice-way placed in the dam for that purpose. This requires a large amount of time, and last year our bill for this alone was about $1,500.” He adds, whether correctly or incorrectly has .yet to be seen, that the “whole fight against the use of the Adirondacks for the storage of water, which might afterwards be turned into a valuable asset to the State, is being put up by club members and private individuals who own parks in the Adirondacks and desire to exclude all others. They are endeavoring by erroneous statements through the press to enlist the general public in aiding them to promote their private interests in hunting and fishing in the Adirondacks, to the exclusion of the public. These persons are using their utmost efforts to spread the false belief that the proposed Const itutional amendment will take away from the State control over its land and waters. Anybody who has examined the amend ment and has read the River improvement law knows—or should know—that, if the amendment is adopted, the State cannot lose one particle of its control, and that all development of streams will be under the complete direction of the State.”

No posts to display