Tampico Water Works System

Tampico Water Works System

On April 4, 1912, after Tampico, Ill., had bonded itself in $11,800 for the installation of a water works system, the work was started. It was completed by July 3, in the same year. A pumping station was built, a steel water tower and tank erected, a pumping system installed and a distribution system of 8,900 feet laid. The source of supply is three wells, with 4-inch castings, each equipped with a No. 8 Cook strainer. The supply seems inexhaustible at a depth of 27 feet. The wells are driven 10 feet apart at the point of junction of an equilateral triangle, and are so connected by a pipe leading to the pump and so equipped with valves as to admit of pumping from any or all of the wells at once. In the pumping station, a one-story building 21 x 29 feet, is installed a gasolene engine of 12-horsepower, connected by a belt with 6 x 10 duplex pump, with a capacity of 300,000 in 24 hours. The tank has a capacity of 40,000 gallons. Its height is 110 feet and the pressure up to 48 pounds. The main is 8-inch and 4-inch, and recently the 4-inch pipes have been extended a distance of 1,200 feet—-a total of 11,000 feet of main laid. The valves number 17; 24 hydrants have been set at an average distance of 440 feet apart, and with the help of 700 feet of hose, practically every house in town can be reached in case of fire and in the course of time every house will have its own service. The population of the town is about 850, and the assessed value of property $236,000. The total expenditure on the water works system, in addition to the $11,800 raised by the bond issue, has been $13,800 to date. Up to the end of the year 30 service connections were made. No meters are installed, as a flat rate schedule has been adopted.

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